Ron – Black, Cuban, Mexican and Switched at Birth as Chinese!

“As a sort of irony, I was born a Chinese baby. Baby Boy Wong”

Our friend Ron Lyles shares how he was mislabeled as a Chinese baby at birth, how his family’s former slave-owners found him, and the importance of including ‘culture’ in dialogues about race.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks

Roland Martin took Stacey Dash to task for her comments about BET and Black networks during Thursday’s edition of NewsOne Now.

 

Click through for [VIDEO]

Sourced through Scoop.it from: newsone.com

How I Learned about the One-Drop Rule: Mark

TRANSCRIPT:

 

FANSHEN: Recently I asked my friends when was the first time that they heard about the one-drop rule. And their answers were really incredible, so we’re sharing them here and we’d like to hear yours. So send us an email (onedropoflove(at)gmail, tweet us, anything, and let us know: when was the first time that YOU learned about the one-drop rule?


MARK
: I self-identify as mixed, but I am politically Black. In our family we never talked about race or the one-drop rule – anything. And so basically I just intuited that there was a one-drop rule because I was defined as Black growing up as far as my experiences.

My dearest friend, growing up, would call me “contraband” because he learned about the phrase – he read something about slavery and that a slave that was seeking freedom, if they were caught they were considered ‘contraband’ and he thought that was funny. I had no knowledge, so he was calling me contraband and it hurt like hell and I had no ability to defend myself or to articulate a different argument.

So it really wasn’t until I graduated from high school, I was in the Marine Corps, I came across an interesting story in the New York Times about a woman who was suing the State of Louisiana because her birth certificate said that she was ‘Colored.’ She was raised White, she self-identified as White. And she fought her case all the way up to the Supreme Court and lost because according to state law, in 1970 if you were just any – any trace of Black, you were Colored to 1/32 Black, you were Colored. And she had 3/32s – they even went so far as to hire a genealogist. And so that fascinated me – it really resonated with me. I couldn’t articulate why, but I just found it a fascinating story.

Ten years later I was attending school at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland and I learned about the one-drop rule. And that’s where I learned about slavery, I learned about Manifest Destiny, etc. etc. etc. And I learned about the one-drop rule and I learned how pernicious and ridiculous it is and how hard we work to create a caste system and what really saddened me was defining Black as a negative – that if you had any part Black in you, that was not a good thing. And that’s…that’s heartbreaking. Nobody should ever have that experience and it will end because of people like Fanshen, who are creating this space for us to talk about elements of racism such as the one-drop rule and I’m very appreciative and have much gratitude for allowing me to share my story of how I learned about the one-drop rule.


SPOKESPERSON
: Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel to keep up with the latestOne Drop news and other videos. Do you have ideas for more video content? Tell us what you’d like to see. We’ll see you next time to share more drops of love. Be sure to tell us by commenting here and on Twitter and Facebook, how YOU are spreading drops of love.

 

From

http://www.onedropoflove.org/how-i-learned-about-the-one-drop-rule-mark/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

Brown Is The New White: Dissecting The Demographic Revolution That Is Creating A New American Majority

There are more people of color in the U.S. than ever before, and that growth is expected to make a big difference in this year’s election.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: newsone.com

The Rosa Parks Story

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks was the greatest, most distinguished African American Woman Civil Rights Activist of our time. The woman known as “the first lady of civil rights” was born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama to James McCauley and Leona Edwards, her parents, a carpenter and a teacher, respectively. Her ancestry was a mixture of African American, Cherokee-Creek and Scots-Irish, which some say accounts for her fair complexion. In 1932, Rosa married Raymond Parks, a barber from Montgomery, at her mother’s house.

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: thoughtprovokingperspectives.co

Zendaya Coleman is Getting Her Very Own Barbie Doll

During a recent visit to the Mattel offices, Zendaya discussed her relationship with Barbie growing up:

 

“When I was little, I didn’t have one that looked like me, so I couldn’t connect with her in that way. But getting to visit the Mattel offices and see Barbie’s vision for the future…I was able to see how they plan to diversify, broadening the horizons and the image of Barbie, and make it more, you know, open. I left the office feeling it was definitely something I wanted to be a part of.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: goodblacknews.org

Mixed Experience History Month 2015: William H. Johnson, artist


Born in 1901, William H. Johnson was a talented artist who became famous for his Scandinavian landscape paintings and “primitive” scenes of black life.
A South Carolina native and son of an African-American/Sioux woman and a white man, Johnson moved to New York in 1918 to study at the National Academy of Design

 

Continue reading…

Source: www.themixedexperience.com

Was Cleopatra black?

Was Cleopatra black? Spike Lee thinks so. Even Shakespeare, no Afrocentrist he, called her “tawny” (yellowish-brown). Hollywood, though, makes her white (pictured).


But what do the facts say?


Continue reading…

Source: abagond.wordpress.com

Shadeism [VIDEO]

“This short TV documentary is an introduction to the issue of shadeism, the discrimination that exists between the lighter-skinned and darker-skinned members of the same community. This documentary short looks specifically at how it affects young womyn within the African, Caribbean, and South Asian diasporas. Through the eyes and words of 5 young womyn and 1 little girl – all females of colour – the film takes us into the thoughts and experiences of each. Overall, ‘Shadeism’ explores where shadeism comes from, how it directly affects us as womyn of colour, and ultimately, begins to explore how we can move forward through dialogue and discussion.” -unique5589

 

HT – My American Meltingpot

 

Shadeism website

 

Source: www.youtube.com