Pure Beauty: Judging Race in Japanese American Beauty Pageants: Rebecca Chiyoko King-O’Riain

“With a low rate of immigration and a high rate of interracial marriage, Japanese Americans today compose the Asian ethnic group with the largest proportion of mixed-race members.”

See on www.amazon.com

Debrahlee Lorenzana – Puerto Rican / Italian

Debbie Lorenzana—whose mother is Puerto Rican and father is Italian—came to New York from Puerto Rico 12 years ago.”
“I’ve seen men turn into complete idiots around her. But it’s not her fault that they act this way…”
Community Village‘s insight:
Interesting problem to have. Good looks that are distracting, turn people into bumbling idiots, and cause you to get fired.
– -Glenn Robinson

See on www.villagevoice.com

in the Mix: Calif. artist brings her mixed heritage themed works to Hub

“The beauty of art is the ambiguity,” says sculptor Alison Saar discussing her current exhibit “STILL…” showing at the Sandra and David Bakalar Gallery at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

See on baystatebanner.com

▶ “Dark Girls”–A Look At Colorism and Internalized Racism In The Black Community!!(Full Documentary) – YouTube

Dark Girls is a 2012 documentary film by American filmmakers Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry. It documents colorism based on skin tone among African American…

See on www.youtube.com

Mixed-race faces appeal more: study | Otago Daily Times Online News

People of mixed-race are more attractive, unless those judging are thinking about what racial group the person belongs to, University of Otago research shows.

“People preferred blended faces because they more closely fitted a person’s general idea of what a face should look like based on the ”population of faces” they had been exposed to.

”When you think of multiracial individuals as examples of humans they are more appealing because they better capture your overall experience of life.”

But when people were thinking of the blended faces as examples of racial groups their ambiguity ”pulls down their appeal” because they were difficult to categorise.”
See on www.odt.co.nz