How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

 

Race-in-America

How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity.

Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scriptswhich highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.amazon.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

The Case for Loving: The Fight for Interracial Marriage by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls

 

I fell in love with this book the moment I saw it. The cover itself featuring the entire Loving family in a close embrace, seemingly on Dad’s lap as Mom and Dad exchange a gaze as warm as a hug, emanates warmth and makes me feel a sense of strength and belonging. Right now I let my four-year-old interpret the illustrations and make her own story but I have cleared a center space on one of our bookshelves to present this book and look forward to the day when I will read my daughter the words. Written and illustrated by an interracial wife and husband team—Selina Alko and Sean Qualls— who include their own short bio of being an interracial couple at the end of the book, the narrative weaves the sensitive story of the Loving family from the perspectives of Mildred, Richard, and their children with the harsh facts of U.S.America’s racial history. While the narrative portrays some aspects of the love story between Mildred and Richard, as children read the images and/or words of this picture book, they will connect with the Loving children through the cozy illustrations and narrative lines like “Donald, Peggy, and Sidney had two parents who loved them, and who loved each other.” The third person omniscient narrative voice switches from the children’s perspective to the parents’ to a compassionate voice detailing as delicately as possible, the disturbing realities of Reconstruction Era, Jim Crow, and other racist laws of United States’ history.

 

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Source: mixeddiversityreads.com

 

Perfect post for Valentines day 😀

 

 

My Mom is a Foreigner but Not to Me by Julianne Moore

 

I love this book so very much
I can read it ten good times
She represents a child’s experience
With such cool, catchy rhymes

This book by Julianne Moore, primarily written in ABCB rhyming quatrain stanzas, is a first person narrative from the perspective of a dozen different children, which talks about the varied experiences of a child living in the U.S. with a mother from another country. The illustrator, Meilo So has chosen a “framed” illustration style which, other than the fact that it leaves a lot of white space on the page is successful at providing images for many different aspects of the “story” simultaneously.

 

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Source: mixeddiversityreads.com

Book Review: ‘The Year She Left Us’ by Kathryn Ma

 

Kathryn Ma’s debut novel explores the inner world of an adopted Chinese teenage girl.

 

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Source: hapamama.com

Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America

 

Diversity Explosion shares the good news about diversity in the coming decades, and the more globalized, multiracial country that U.S. is becoming.

 

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Source: www.mixedracestudies.org

 

HT Steven Riley of MixedRaceStudies.org @mixed_race

Review of “Bird” by Crystal Chan

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Pros: Great start to book! Author has excellent ability to speak from a child’s perspective, although with more complexity and grace. Great plot and great surprises all the way to the end.

Cons: None.

Summary: “Bird” by Crystal Chan is an excellent surprise of a book! I assumed that the book would be about the trials and triumphs of a mixed race girl as she learns to handle society’s response to her identity. That isn’t a bad concept for a book, but I’ve read plenty of books like that. What I received from Crystal Chan was a book that demonstrated, rather than just showed, the fluidity of identity, childhood, culture and more on par with books like “To Kill a Mockingbird”. It began with a very gripping scene and then mellowed a little as the reader gets to travel in the life of “Bird” (the main character. From there, the plot thickens as Bird has to navigate through many worlds as a lone daughter with parents of two different cultures and perspectives, as a friend to John (who turns out to be something else than what he says), and as a griever to her long-dead brother whose impression still haunts the family.

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See on thiscollegedropout.wordpress.com

LeiLani Nishime explores the Asian American experience in her new book

Author Leilani Nishime explains what motivated her to write about multiracial Asian-Americans in her new book,

See on www.seattleglobalist.com

Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future (Revised and Updated Edition)

Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future (Revised and Updated Edition) (American Assembly Books) [Angela Glover Blackwell, Stewart Kwoh, Manuel Pastor] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

See on www.amazon.com

Barrios to Burbs: The Making of the Mexican American Middle Class: Jody Vallejo

Too frequently, the media and politicians cast Mexican immigrants as a threat to American society. Given America’s increasing ethnic diversity and the large size of the Mexican-origin population, an investigation of how Mexican immigrants and their descendants achieve upward mobility and enter the middle class is long overdue. Barrios to Burbs offers a new understanding of the Mexican American experience.

See on www.amazon.com