How I Learned about the One-Drop Rule: Mark

TRANSCRIPT:

 

FANSHEN: Recently I asked my friends when was the first time that they heard about the one-drop rule. And their answers were really incredible, so we’re sharing them here and we’d like to hear yours. So send us an email (onedropoflove(at)gmail, tweet us, anything, and let us know: when was the first time that YOU learned about the one-drop rule?


MARK
: I self-identify as mixed, but I am politically Black. In our family we never talked about race or the one-drop rule – anything. And so basically I just intuited that there was a one-drop rule because I was defined as Black growing up as far as my experiences.

My dearest friend, growing up, would call me “contraband” because he learned about the phrase – he read something about slavery and that a slave that was seeking freedom, if they were caught they were considered ‘contraband’ and he thought that was funny. I had no knowledge, so he was calling me contraband and it hurt like hell and I had no ability to defend myself or to articulate a different argument.

So it really wasn’t until I graduated from high school, I was in the Marine Corps, I came across an interesting story in the New York Times about a woman who was suing the State of Louisiana because her birth certificate said that she was ‘Colored.’ She was raised White, she self-identified as White. And she fought her case all the way up to the Supreme Court and lost because according to state law, in 1970 if you were just any – any trace of Black, you were Colored to 1/32 Black, you were Colored. And she had 3/32s – they even went so far as to hire a genealogist. And so that fascinated me – it really resonated with me. I couldn’t articulate why, but I just found it a fascinating story.

Ten years later I was attending school at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland and I learned about the one-drop rule. And that’s where I learned about slavery, I learned about Manifest Destiny, etc. etc. etc. And I learned about the one-drop rule and I learned how pernicious and ridiculous it is and how hard we work to create a caste system and what really saddened me was defining Black as a negative – that if you had any part Black in you, that was not a good thing. And that’s…that’s heartbreaking. Nobody should ever have that experience and it will end because of people like Fanshen, who are creating this space for us to talk about elements of racism such as the one-drop rule and I’m very appreciative and have much gratitude for allowing me to share my story of how I learned about the one-drop rule.


SPOKESPERSON
: Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel to keep up with the latestOne Drop news and other videos. Do you have ideas for more video content? Tell us what you’d like to see. We’ll see you next time to share more drops of love. Be sure to tell us by commenting here and on Twitter and Facebook, how YOU are spreading drops of love.

 

From

http://www.onedropoflove.org/how-i-learned-about-the-one-drop-rule-mark/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

Walter Plecker

Walter Plecker (1861-1947), a White American eugenicist, was the mastermind of the state of Virginia’s Act to Preserve Racial Integrity (1924). The law was an instrument of Jim Crow and did considerable damage to Native American tribes. It led to Loving v Virginia (1967), which made mixed-race marriages legal across the US.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com

Three “Mixed” people killed by police in Las Vegas since 1996

Monday, April 4, 2011 at 4:45 am

2895 E. Charleston Blvd.

Las Vegas SWAT officer Mike Quick fatally shot Michael Dean Chevalier, 48, after Chevalier enters an apartment on 2695 E. Charleston Blvd., takes a woman hostage, and sexually assaults her.

 

Wednesday, September 2, 2009 at 12:30 pm

1230 Comstock Drive

After setting his home on fire, apparently to draw officers to the scene, Bryan Benjamin Hanasz, 36, shot at arriving firefighters and police, one of whom was wounded. Three Las Vegas police officers shot and killed Hanasz at the home near Vegas Drive and Martin Luther King Boulevard.

 

Friday, January 19, 1996 at 5:42 pm

Interstate 15 at Apex

On Interstate 15 near Apex, Nevada Highway Patrol trooper Anthony Skordoulis approached a homeless man, Miguel Angel Gomez, 44, to offer assistance after spotting the man holding a “need gas” sign. Gomez shot him in the leg, leading to a standoff in which he and two Las Vegas officers fired their weapons. Gomez was wounded but lived five more years.

 

Click through for more detail

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.reviewjournal.com

Syrian Refugees and America’s Long History of Selective Immigration Policy

On November 13, 2015, Yazidi refugees In Derek, Syria, react to news that their homeland of Sinjar was liberated from ISIS extremists.
Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

 

If the Senate votes yes to the American SAFE Act that Congress passed last week, it will be much more difficult for Syrian civil war refugees to come into the United States. It’s just the latest in American immigration policy shaped by xenophobia and racism.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.colorlines.com

The hypocrisy of #AllLivesMatter

The Closest Look Yet at Gentrification and Displacement

A new study finds that gentrification improves Philadelphia neighborhoods, but its ripple effects hurt the most vulnerable.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.citylab.com

HT Robert Strupp, Executive Director at Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc (BNI)

The Native Peoples of the Chesapeake Bay Region

A guest post by Jefe:


For at least 11,000 years
, people have inhabited the Chesapeake Bay Regionalong the Atlantic coast of North America, now the part of the US known as Washington, DC and the states of Virginia, Maryland and Delaware.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com

What finally broke the ‘no Chicanos’ rule at the reemergent Museum of Latin American Art

The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach has its first ever exhibition devoted entirely to the work of Chicano artists. Seen here: a detail of Frank Romero’s majestic “¡Méjico, Mexico!,” a wall-sized canvas painted in 1984. (Cheech Marin Collection / MOLAA)

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.latimes.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Asian American Studies

By Robyn Rodriguez

 

They went back to campus, but they didn’t go to class. Instead, students at San Francisco State went on strike for five months, the longest academic student strike in American higher education history, and shut down their university. Their peaceful protests for the admission of a greater number of minority students, an education that reflected their families’ and ancestors’ histories and experiences, as well as more community control of their education, were met with violent police repression. Yet they stood their ground. led by a multiracial coalition, the Third World Liberation Front, would lead to the establishment of Ethnic Studies, including Asian American Studies, on that campus. Students on college and university campuses across the state of California, inspired by their peers at San Francisco State, followed suit soon after. Years later, students on campuses beyond California would be inspired to do the same. On those campuses where Asian American students were brave enough to stand up to their college and university administrations, Asian American studies programs and departments were formed.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.racefiles.com

Maryland: first anti-miscegenation statue in 1661

Guest Post by Steven F. Riley

It should be noted that the Loving v. Virginia ruling in 1967 applied to the 16 remaining states that had enacted anti-miscegenation statutes. Thus it is a fallacy to state that ‘interracial marriage was illegal in the United States until Loving v. Virginia. Most states had in fact, repealed their anti-miscegenation laws and a few never enacted any such laws at all (New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, Minnesota, Wisconsin, District of Columbia, Hawaii and Alaska). FROM MIXED RACE STUDIES

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: mixemag.wordpress.com

Thank you Mr. Riley! This is a great detailed article!

Misty Copeland

Misty Copeland (1982- ), an American classical ballet dancer, in 2015 became the first Black American woman ever to become a principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre (ABT). That makes her one of the top ballerinas at one of the top classical ballet companies in the world! Mikhail Baryshnikov was a principal at ABT.

 

In the US, ballet is mainly seen as a White thing. Accordingly, many assume that rail-thin White women make the best ballerinas. But, as Copeland herself has shown, that comes from prejudice, not from the demands of the art.

 

Copeland did not start ballet till age 13. Many professionals start at age three. Yet she could do in months what took most girls years of practice.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com