Number Of Unaccompanied Minors Detained At U.S. Border Continues To Rise

The number of unaccompanied minors detained at the U.S. border with Mexico continues to rise, with more than 6,700 taken into custody in December alone, according to the latest figures released this week.

 

The number is a jump from roughly 5,600 detained in November and 4,973 in October, according to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Compared to same three-month period in 2014, the number of apprehensions in 2015 represents a 117% jump.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.buzzfeed.com

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Navajo Kindergartner Sent Home First Day of School For Having Long Hair – UPDATE

Navajo Kindergartner with long hair ponytail sent home (2014), School still forbids long hair and ponytails on boys in 2015-2016

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: 500nations.us

I did more research after Amanda Blackhorse @blackhorse_a asked “Does anyone know where this school is?”

 

What I found was shocking.

Critical Children’s Lit: Challenging Racism with Graphic Novels

This book traces the history and diversity of Latin@ people in the US and shows readers the roots of racism and how it continues today.  Like Still I Rise, Latino USA presents multiple perspectives within and among Latin@ communities about historical and contemporary issues, demonstrating how Latin@s aren’t a homogeneous group and encouraging critical thinking.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.criticalchildrenslit.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Does It Matter That Purvi Patel’s Baby Was Mixed-Race?

by Sharon H. Chang

In February/March of this year Purvi Patel, a 33-year-old Indian-American woman, became the first woman in the U.S. to be charged, convicted and sentenced for feticide and child neglect over the loss of her late-term fetus.

It started with barely a hunch. I read, “resulted from…relationship with a married co-worker,” “didn’t want her conservative Hindu parents to know,” “shouldn’t have sex outside of marriage,” and a light bulb was dimly lit in my mind. I reflected on those words and in them I saw boundaries, boundary-crossing: (cis)female/male, married/unmarried, Hindu/non-Hindu, proper/improper, faith/fear, expectation/defiance. The light bulb grew brighter; an unformed contemplation sat vaguely in the corner. Then other details emerged: immigrant/American, authority/subordinate, empowered/disempowered, justice/injustice. The light bulb grew even brighter, illuminating an idea that stood up and stepped forward out of shadow.

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Source: multiasianfamilies.blogspot.com

Powerful article. Thank you for sharing Sharon!

Reunite a Domestic Violence Survivor with Her Daughter!

StandWithNanHui and Stop the Deportation! Reunite a Domestic Violence Survivor with Her Daughter!

Source: action.ndlon.org

 

Thank you for sharing this Sharon @multiasianfams

 

Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation – Kindle edition

 

From School Library Journal

Gr 2–5—When the Mendezes moved to Westminster, CA, in 1944, third-grader Sylvia tried to enter Westminster School. However, the family was repeatedly told, “‘Your children have to go to the Mexican school.’ ‘But why?’ asked Mr. Mendez……’That is how it is done.'” In response, they formed the Parents’ Association of Mexican-American Children, distributed petitions, and eventually filed a successful lawsuit that was supported by organizations ranging from the Japanese American Citizens League to the American Jewish Congress. Younger children will be outraged by the injustice of the Mendez family story but pleased by its successful resolution. Older children will understand the importance of the 1947 ruling that desegregated California schools, paving the way for Brown v. Board of Education seven years later. Back matter includes a detailed author’s note and photographs. The excellent bibliography cites primary sources, including court transcripts and the author’s interview with Sylvia Mendez, who did attend Westminster School and grew up to earn the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Tonatiuh’s illustrations tell a modern story with figures reminiscent of the pictorial writing of the Mixtec, an indigenous people from Mexico. Here, the author deliberately connects his heritage with the prejudices of mid-20th century America. One jarring illustration of three brown children barred from a pool filled with lighter-skinned children behind a sign that reads, “No Dogs or Mexicans Allowed,” will remind readers of photographs from the Jim Crow South. Compare and contrast young Sylvia Mendez’s experience with Robert Coles’s The Story of Ruby Bridges (Scholastic, 1995) to broaden a discussion of school desegregation.—Toby Rajput, National Louis University, Skokie, IL
– Click through for more –

Source: www.amazon.com

Art is…

Art is
Art is

Favianna: artist. agitator. intellectual.

“I care about: women, sex, sluts, queers, love, migration, justice and the planet. I work for global justice.”

 

Source: instagram.com

Alicia Menendez Interview: Trans People & Media’s Invasive Questions | Janet Mock

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Janet Mock flips the script on the Fusion host asking about her body, vagina and identity to demonstrate how transgender people are treated by journalists.

See on janetmock.com

Beyond Racial Gridlock: Embracing Mutual Responsibility: George Yancey:

Christians have struggled with racial issues for centuries, and often inadvertently contribute to the problem. Many proposed solutions have been helpful, but these only take us so far. Adding to this complex situation is the reality that Christians of different races see the issues differently. Sociologist George Yancey surveys a range of approaches to racial healing that Christians have used and offers a new model for moving forward.

See on www.amazon.com

The Bay Area Reporter Online | Queer women’s film project showcases racial divide

Toasted Marshmallows is a film, performance, and community-building project created by two mixed-race queer women of color who’ve identified a gap in popular culture’s representation of mixed-race narratives.

See on www.ebar.com