Eartha Kitt’s daughter, Kitt Shapiro, on growing up multiracial with an internationally famous multiracial mother and on maintaining her mother’s legacy, Ep. 45 from Multiracial Family Man

http://app.stitcher.com/splayer/f/71251/41827908

Listen to Multiracial Family Man episodes free, on demand. Ep. 45: Kitt Shapiro is the daughter of late international star Eartha Kitt, who passed away from colon cancer in 2008. She is the founder and creator of the Simply Eartha™ lifestyle brand (http://www.simplyeartha.com/) and served as president of Eartha Kitt Productions for more than 20 years. Her work with her mother was highlighted by her own Grammy nomination as executive producer of Eartha Kitt’s CD, “Back in Business.” Shapiro attended Barnard College/Columbia University before beginning a successful modeling career. She studied interior design and worked in the fashion industry before taking on the responsibilities of running her mother’s company. Shapiro has dedicated herself to sharing her mother’s story and bringing attention to the importance of colon cancer screening and early detection, and, toward that end, she serves as a Board Member for the Colon Cancer Alliance (http://www.ccalliance.org/).
Listen as Kitt speaks with Alex about living and traveling with her mother, about growing up as a multiracial person with a multiracial mom and about her maintaining her mother’s legacy through her lifestyle brand, Simply Eartha, and through her work withe Colon Cancer Alliance.
For more on host, Alex Barnett, please check out his website: www.alexbarnettcomic.com or visit him on Facebook (www.facebook.com/alexbarnettcomic) or on Twitter at @barnettcomic
To subscribe to the Multiracial Family Man, please click here: MULTIRACIAL FAMILY MAN PODCAST

Intro and Outro Music is Funkorama by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons – By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Listen to over 40,000 radio shows, podcasts and live radio stations for free on your iPhone, iPad, Android and PC. Discover the best of news, entertainment, comedy, sports and talk radio on demand with Stitcher Radio.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.stitcher.com

The Growing Poverty Crisis That Everyone Is Ignoring

Sameth Mell’s family at High Point Housing in Seattle circa 1990

 

WRITTEN BY SHARON H. CHANG – GUEST CONTRIBUTOR SEP 26, 2015 9:00AM

 

Conventional wisdom says Asian Americans are prospering economically, but that’s not the whole story.

 

Sameth is infuriated to see little to no U.S. recognition of these struggles or the resilience and resistance of his people. Especially since it was America’s secret bombing of Cambodia under the Nixon administration during the Vietnam War that lead to the rise of the Khmer Rouge which executed his mother’s family, Sameth believes the government owes the refugee community that resulted. “You got some shit that you did to our country and you have the audacity to act like you can’t give us resources? You kidding me?” he said. “You bombed my country. You devastated our countryside. You fucked up our politics…You did all this so when we’re over here, you’re still treating us like shit. Give us the resources so that we can actually rebuild our pride in ourselves and our community.”

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: thinkprogress.org

Fresh Off the Boat – Review by Jefe

A guest post by Jefe:


“Fresh Off the Boat”
 (2015– ) is a US television sitcom that features an Asian American main cast, the first since “All American Girl” (1994) starring Margaret Cho. It is pretty much “The Wonder Years” with Asian faces. Critics have largely praised the show.

It is inspired by a book, “Fresh Off the Boat: A Memoir” (2013) by Eddie Huang,  a Taiwanese American lawyer and restauranteur.


Premise:
 Eddie Huang’s family moves from Washington, DC’s Chinatown to suburban Orlando, Florida in the mid 1990s to run a steakhouse. The family struggles with assimilation in their new environment while Eddie finds solace in hip hop.

 

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Source: abagond.wordpress.com

MamasDay.Org Offers Free, Diverse e-Cards for Mother’s Day

In its fifth year, Strong Families, an organization dedicated to supporting families that may not fall within traditional definitions, is offering free e-cards for Mother’s Day via mamasday.org.

 

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Source: goodblacknews.org

Fresh Off the Boat – Review

 

The Huangs find themselves living in a largely white suburban community, running a restaurant that serves a largely white clientele, and attending largely white public schools. As a family, they are different from most of the people around them. But within the family, there is difference too. Louis is a nice-guy optimist; Jessica is a realist surrounded by an endless litany of American absurdities. Eddie’s brothers seem to blend in seamlessly, and Eddie—well, Eddie is an Asian American kid, born to Asian immigrant parents, who is so alienated by the dominant white culture that the only way he can relate to it is through hip-hop and other signifiers of black culture. “If you’re an outsider,” an older Eddie voice-overs, “hip-hop is your anthem.”

 

– Click through for more –

 

Source: www.slate.com

 

Anybody see Fresh Off the Boat last night?

In the trailer here I have one big complaint. The part where the mom says “If you get lost, go with a white family – you will be safe there.” Not funny at all. Not one bit. Actually extremely offensive. Both because it portrays the mom as being racially biased against people of color (racist) and it portrays the mom as not knowing actual crime statistics (ignorant).

 

I can appreciate humor from ignorant things that people do, but not when the ignorance is combined with racism.

 

On another note, it’s not really funny that they portray the mom as not knowing what the word ‘sample’ means. She clearly knows English. She just has an accent. Having an accent does not mean that a person is ignorant of vocabulary. I can let that joke slide, but not the racist one. Racism isn’t funny to me. It’s stomach churning.

 

Toni Morrison to Colbert: ‘There’s No Such Thing As Race’ – COLORLINES

The Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author broke it down.

Source: colorlines.com

 

The audience was dead silent when she said there is no such thing as race.

I bet there were confused as hell.

‘Cause they and we all know racism is real, and how can racism be real without race?

I think when we oversimplify ‘race as a social construct’ – only – then we confuse the hell out of people.

 

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Disambiguation and the answer to why all this talk about race

Ice, water, and steam are all forms of water. Race also needs to be understood in different ways and through different lenses.

 

The  lens of society

 

Society racializes us. A race label is applied to us regardless of our true ethnic heritage.

 

The lens of sociology

 

Race is the label that the census and school applications require of us to self identify  in order to track discrimination, a requirement since the 1964 civil rights. Race (phenotype) is based on our outward appearance, whereas race (haplotype) takes into account our whole physical identity – inside and out.

 

The lens of medical science

Most anthropologists describe race (phenotype) as a social construct, often used to discriminate and segregate. Whereas most medical scientists, who are curing diseases, will describe race (haplotype) as real. Medical institutions collect data on self identified race (phenotype). As dangerous as the slippery slope of race-base medicine is, there has been success in finding bone marrow donors through race based donation drives for groups who find it challenging to find a bone marrow match for example.

 

The lens of hate

 

Humans are tribal by nature. Wired into us is a fear of the new that we do not understand and therefor a fear of the other. The word for this is xenophobia. Having unchecked fear and living in a society that normalizes the doctrine of white supremacy leads to the normalization of racism.

 

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PS – I read The Bluest Eye. It’s good.