A conversation on what it means to be mixed race

The last Census report taken in 2010 showed that the population identifying themselves as multi-racial grew by 32% over the census in 2000.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.king5.com

My friend and LEADING intellectual on Mixed Race and social justice Sharon H Chang has made it to TV!

 

In this short video she provides a solid foundation on the topic that will enable us to jump start the conversation and find the courage to speak about what so long has been kept out of the spotlight.

 

At the end of the video you will see the power of a good question. The simplest questions can steer us to the light.

 

Kudos Sharon!

San Francisco State investigates confrontation over white student’s dreadlocks

From Yahoo News: San Francisco State University is investigating an on-campus incident in which a black woman confronted a white man for wearing dreadlocks.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.yahoo.com

Help me understand this.

 

What I thought I understood was that making fun of a culture is what’s clearly wrong. In other words, dressing up as another culture for a laugh or for Halloween.

 

If a person wears their hair any given way, mohawk, dreadlocs, up, down, permed, or straightened – that seems like a fair choice in today’s multiculture and mixed world.

 

If we start to police dreadlocs, where do we stop?

 

Couldn’t we then also debate suntan lotion, colored contacts, and every piece of clothing.

Jinn- A Narrative Film About Identity, Islam & First Love

Nijla Baseema Mu’min is raising funds for Jinn- A Narrative Film About Identity, Islam & First Love on Kickstarter!

A shape-shifting, pepperoni- loving, black teenage instagram celebrity converts to Islam. Here’s what happens.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.kickstarter.com

‘Blaxicans’ photos explore multicultural nexus

“Duality: Blaxicans in LA” explores multiracial identity among the Los Angeles’ two largest minority groups: African-Americans and Mexican-Americans.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cnn.com

SURVEY: U.S. Afro-Latinos More Likely to Identify as White Than Black

The Pew Research Center survey also revealed that a quarter of Afro-Latinos report their race as “Hispanic.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.colorlines.com

Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling: The Fifth Minority

This timely, in-depth examination of the educational experiences and needs of mixed-race children (“the fifth minority”) focuses on the four contexts that primarily influence learning and development: the family, school, community, and society-at-large.
The book provides foundational historical, social, political, and psychological information about mixed-race children and looks closely at their experiences in schools, their identity formation, and how schools can be made more supportive of their development and learning needs. Moving away from an essentialist discussion of mixed-race children, a wide variety of research is included. Life and schooling experiences of mixed-raced individuals are profiled throughout the text. Rather than pigeonholing children into a neat box of descriptions or providing ready made prescriptions for educators, Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling offers information and encourages teachers to critically reflect on how it is relevant to and helpful in their teaching/learning contexts.


Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I: Being Mixed-Race in Society
    • Chapter 1: The Context of Race for Mixed-Race People
    • Chapter 2: Mixed-Race People in Society Over Time
    • Chapter 3: Racial Identity: Multiple Perspectives on Racial Self-Understanding
  • Part II: Family, Community, and Peers
    • Chapter 4: Structures, Practices, and Socialization in Interracial and Multiracial Families
    • Chapter 5: Community, Social Class and Sociocultural Interactions
    • Chapter 6: Peer Relations and Friendship Formations
  • Part III: Education and Schooling: People, Places, and Practices
    • Chapter 7: Teachers’ (Mixed) Race Constructions and Teaching in Multiracial Classrooms
    • Chapter 8: The Racial Context of Schooling and Mixed-race Youth
    • Chapter 9: Schooling Supportive of Mixed-Race Youth
  • Index

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.routledge.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

FEATURED MULTIRACIAL FAMILY: MEET THE LUSBY FAMILY!

MEET THE LUSBY FAMILY:
Brandon, age 30
African American with a small percentage of Native American. We are on the quest to find out exactly what else as we both actually have in our gene pool.
Virginia, age 31
50% Italian/ 38% Filipino/ 6% Spanish/ 6% Chinese. My father is a deceased Italian citizen of Neapolitan descent whose family still resides in Italy. My mother is a 1st generation immigrant with parents from the Philippine provinces of Pampanga and Iloilo who were mixed slightly with Chinese and Spanish.
Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.swirlnationblog.com

Ron – Black, Cuban, Mexican and Switched at Birth as Chinese!

“As a sort of irony, I was born a Chinese baby. Baby Boy Wong”

Our friend Ron Lyles shares how he was mislabeled as a Chinese baby at birth, how his family’s former slave-owners found him, and the importance of including ‘culture’ in dialogues about race.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com