A conversation on what it means to be mixed race

The last Census report taken in 2010 showed that the population identifying themselves as multi-racial grew by 32% over the census in 2000.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.king5.com

My friend and LEADING intellectual on Mixed Race and social justice Sharon H Chang has made it to TV!

 

In this short video she provides a solid foundation on the topic that will enable us to jump start the conversation and find the courage to speak about what so long has been kept out of the spotlight.

 

At the end of the video you will see the power of a good question. The simplest questions can steer us to the light.

 

Kudos Sharon!

‘Blaxicans’ photos explore multicultural nexus

“Duality: Blaxicans in LA” explores multiracial identity among the Los Angeles’ two largest minority groups: African-Americans and Mexican-Americans.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cnn.com

Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling: The Fifth Minority

This timely, in-depth examination of the educational experiences and needs of mixed-race children (“the fifth minority”) focuses on the four contexts that primarily influence learning and development: the family, school, community, and society-at-large.
The book provides foundational historical, social, political, and psychological information about mixed-race children and looks closely at their experiences in schools, their identity formation, and how schools can be made more supportive of their development and learning needs. Moving away from an essentialist discussion of mixed-race children, a wide variety of research is included. Life and schooling experiences of mixed-raced individuals are profiled throughout the text. Rather than pigeonholing children into a neat box of descriptions or providing ready made prescriptions for educators, Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling offers information and encourages teachers to critically reflect on how it is relevant to and helpful in their teaching/learning contexts.


Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I: Being Mixed-Race in Society
    • Chapter 1: The Context of Race for Mixed-Race People
    • Chapter 2: Mixed-Race People in Society Over Time
    • Chapter 3: Racial Identity: Multiple Perspectives on Racial Self-Understanding
  • Part II: Family, Community, and Peers
    • Chapter 4: Structures, Practices, and Socialization in Interracial and Multiracial Families
    • Chapter 5: Community, Social Class and Sociocultural Interactions
    • Chapter 6: Peer Relations and Friendship Formations
  • Part III: Education and Schooling: People, Places, and Practices
    • Chapter 7: Teachers’ (Mixed) Race Constructions and Teaching in Multiracial Classrooms
    • Chapter 8: The Racial Context of Schooling and Mixed-race Youth
    • Chapter 9: Schooling Supportive of Mixed-Race Youth
  • Index

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.routledge.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Ron – Black, Cuban, Mexican and Switched at Birth as Chinese!

“As a sort of irony, I was born a Chinese baby. Baby Boy Wong”

Our friend Ron Lyles shares how he was mislabeled as a Chinese baby at birth, how his family’s former slave-owners found him, and the importance of including ‘culture’ in dialogues about race.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

Mixed Race or Adoptive Families, Participate in Santana’s project, “Somewhere in Between”

Somewhere In Between

 

Aimed at giving a voice to people who have experienced living between worlds, not quite fitting into just one, and offering them a platform to express how those experiences have shaped their identity. Santana Dempsey, a professional actor and adoptee/mixed race advocate, is leading “Somewhere In Between”. She is most interested in the worlds of adoption, and the mixed race experience.

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.somewhere-in-between.com

I know Santana from her work and I’ve meet her at Mixed Remixed in Los Angles. She’s a Superstar! Passionate, intelligent and talented.

Please support her and her work.

 

 

-glenn

Eartha Kitt’s daughter, Kitt Shapiro, on growing up multiracial with an internationally famous multiracial mother and on maintaining her mother’s legacy, Ep. 45 from Multiracial Family Man

http://app.stitcher.com/splayer/f/71251/41827908

Listen to Multiracial Family Man episodes free, on demand. Ep. 45: Kitt Shapiro is the daughter of late international star Eartha Kitt, who passed away from colon cancer in 2008. She is the founder and creator of the Simply Eartha™ lifestyle brand (http://www.simplyeartha.com/) and served as president of Eartha Kitt Productions for more than 20 years. Her work with her mother was highlighted by her own Grammy nomination as executive producer of Eartha Kitt’s CD, “Back in Business.” Shapiro attended Barnard College/Columbia University before beginning a successful modeling career. She studied interior design and worked in the fashion industry before taking on the responsibilities of running her mother’s company. Shapiro has dedicated herself to sharing her mother’s story and bringing attention to the importance of colon cancer screening and early detection, and, toward that end, she serves as a Board Member for the Colon Cancer Alliance (http://www.ccalliance.org/).
Listen as Kitt speaks with Alex about living and traveling with her mother, about growing up as a multiracial person with a multiracial mom and about her maintaining her mother’s legacy through her lifestyle brand, Simply Eartha, and through her work withe Colon Cancer Alliance.
For more on host, Alex Barnett, please check out his website: www.alexbarnettcomic.com or visit him on Facebook (www.facebook.com/alexbarnettcomic) or on Twitter at @barnettcomic
To subscribe to the Multiracial Family Man, please click here: MULTIRACIAL FAMILY MAN PODCAST

Intro and Outro Music is Funkorama by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons – By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. Listen to over 40,000 radio shows, podcasts and live radio stations for free on your iPhone, iPad, Android and PC. Discover the best of news, entertainment, comedy, sports and talk radio on demand with Stitcher Radio.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.stitcher.com

Interview on Sharon H. Chang’s Raising Mixed Race

By Grace Hwang Lynch

 

I’ve been reading a new book by Sharon H. Chang called Raising Mixed Race. You might remember Sharon, a Seattle-based writer and scholar, from her guest post A Multiracial Asian Mom Wonders How Her Son Will See Himself (Routledge 2015). With chapter titles that are analogies to home construction (Foundation, Framing, Wiring, etc.), the book aims to get to the historical ideas behind the way we talk about race, including the concept of mixed race identity. I was especially interested because the research focuses specifically on Asian multiracials. Recently, I had a chance to interview Sharon about her work. Read on…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hapamama.com

When the oppressed turn into oppressors: Parenting & internalised racism

Article by Guilaine Kinouani

 

Excerpts selected by Glenn Robinson

The privilege of being lighter skinned
I am a lighter skinned Black woman. I am light enough to benefit from shadism but dark enough to still be accepted as Black. A uniquely privileged position. Throughout my upbringing I have received messages in my environment that this made me more desirable, more worthy, and/or more significant than my darker skinned counterparts. These messages were both covert and overt and articulated in the home and outside the home, at school, in the media etc… Pretty much everywhere.  There is no doubt that I was, at times, spoken to in kinder voices or treated with more patience than my darker skinned peers or sisters by both people of colour and by White people, all things being equal.  In time, I have learnt that my femininity and womanhood would be more easily accepted.

 

Parenting and internalised racism

 

…in our efforts to compensate for racism, we socialise children into injustice, compliance and complicity and instil a sense of inferiority in them. In doing so we may limit children’s scope to be themselves. We may reduce our capacity to respond to them with compassion and kindness. We may attend to stereotypes of what our children could be or could be seen as, rather than attending to them as unique persons. In a nutshell, we may contribute to racism’s self-fulfilling prophecies, perpetuate racial inequalities and more worryingly, may increase their risk of psychological  distress.
The perpetuation of oppression is everyone’s business

 

  • Internalising racism is adaptive. It is no pathology.
  • The construction of reality is controlled by the dominant group and circulated throughout society
  • those who are oppressed come to internalise the dominant group’s interests as their own
  • the interests of the oppressors are presented as actually reflecting everyone’s best interests…
  • the construction of a superior class is dependent upon the existence of an inferior one.
  • double bind: Be like us to be human. Trying to be like us is evidence that you are not human.
Click through for the whole article.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: racereflections.co.uk

Many pearls of wisdom in this article!

 

Note: Parents of all colors can have internalized racism and bias.

Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai‘i

Paintings by Laura Kina and photographs by Emily Hanako Momohara explore the artists’ mixed-heritage roots in Okinawa and Hawai‘i, employing unique strategies that blend fiction and reality to question the stability of memory and identity. In this video, they discuss their families, identity, and their art.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com