Human American – A conversation between Lincoln and Washington on ‘race’

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

A conversation about race relations in America…
Via www.youtube.com

What Part of Legal Immigration Don’t You Understand? | Infographic

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Via reason.com

When Illegal Immigration Was European

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village World History
“Here’s how hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants—mostly Europeans—became legal:   The Registry Act of 1929 allowed immigrants who arrived before 1921 but had no record of their admission to register retroactively, for a $20 fee.   From 1935 to the late 1950s, to keep families together, tens of thousands of Europeans unlawfully in the U.S. were allowed temporarily to go to Canada and reenter the States legally as a permanent resident.   In 1940, Congress authorized the suspension of orders of deportation in cases of hardship, which it defined as “serious economic detriment” to the immigrant’s immediate family. The guidelines have become less generous, but the principle remains in the law.”
Via www.saramayeux.org

A Non-Immigrant Story: Does it make me any less Latina?

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life
“I once asked her why we never learned to speak spanish. It was with saddened eyes, head down, when she told me “It was because I was spanked in school for not knowing how to speak English.” Spanked as in literally spanked on the hand with rulers for not speaking English as a 5 year old.”
Via tejanamade.wordpress.com

Five Interesting Facts About Native Americans

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

“Because Native Americans are one of the nation’s smallest minority groups, many people aren’t as familiar with them as they are with the country’s larger racial groups. Given the long history indigenous peoples have in the Americas, that’s a shame.” Click to read more
Via racerelations.about.com

Becoming Mexipino: Multiethnic Identities and Communities in San Diego

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

“Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy P. Guevarra Jr. traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century California and the Pacific West Coast.   Through racially restrictive covenants, both groups were confined to segregated living spaces along with African Americans, other Asian groups, and a few European immigrant clusters. Within these urban multiracial spaces, Mexicans and Filipinos coalesced to build a world of their own. Mexipino children, living simultaneously in two cultures, have forged a new identity for themselves and their lives are the lens through which these two communities are examined. Using archival sources, oral histories, newspapers, and personal collections and photographs, Guevarra defines the niche that this particular group carved out for itself.”
Via www.mixedracestudies.org

We Shall Remain | American Experience | PBS

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

From the award-winning PBS series AMERICAN EXPERIENCE comes
WE SHALL REMAIN, a provocative multi-media project that establishes Native history as an essential part of American
Via www.pbs.org

Native Appropriations: Pepper Ann Follow-Up: Why I’m glad I have readers

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

“Yesterday I posted about an awesome Pepper Ann cartoon that dealt with Peppy “discovering” her Navajo ancestry. Then, some readers pointed out some even cooler things I didn’t notice upon first watch, and some pointed out how I had made some really poor language choices in my write-up, so I’ll get to that too.”   Click to read
Via nativeappropriations.blogspot.com

The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica’s work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism.   Engaging with narratives by Jesús Lara, José María Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination.
Via www.mixedracestudies.org

It may not be racist, but it’s a question I’m tired of hearing

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

Ariane Sherine: Looking a bit brown still means being asked where you’re from.
Via www.guardian.co.uk