How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

 

Race-in-America

How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity.

Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scriptswhich highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.amazon.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

The Hand That Feeds Theatrical Trailer

Shy sandwich-maker Mahoma López sets out to end abusive conditions at a popular New York restaurant chain. The epic power struggle that ensues turns a single city block into a battlefield in America’s new wage wars.

thehandthatfeedsfilm.com
facebook.com/TheHandThatFeedsDoc
twitter.com/JubileeFilms

Source: www.youtube.com

Four Commonly Misused Words – Hispanic, Caucasian, White & Female

Hispanic for Latino – NOPE


The word Hispanic was derived from Hispaniola (Spanish speaking island) and the word Hispanic is meant to indicate all Spanish speaking people (including Spain), but leaves out Portuguese speaking people (Brazil).

And more troublesome, onomatopoeically Hispanic sounds really bad. 


Continue reading…


Source: communityvillageus.blogspot.com

Barrios to Burbs: The Making of the Mexican American Middle Class: Jody Vallejo

Too frequently, the media and politicians cast Mexican immigrants as a threat to American society. Given America’s increasing ethnic diversity and the large size of the Mexican-origin population, an investigation of how Mexican immigrants and their descendants achieve upward mobility and enter the middle class is long overdue. Barrios to Burbs offers a new understanding of the Mexican American experience.

See on www.amazon.com

Native American Maternal Haplogroup A2a and B2a Dispersion

Recently, in Phys.org, they published a good overview of a couple of recently written genetic papers dealing with Native American ancestry.  I particularly like this overview, because it’s written …

Community Village‘s insight:

I wonder how accurate haplogroup definitions are.
Are the “Unspecified USA” people mixes of mixes?


I have yet to see a haplogroup chart that describes mixed people in detail.
Would they even be able to with “full genome testing” that will be “utilized soon”?


See on nativeheritageproject.com

Punjabi Sikh-Mexican American community fading into history

Anti-immigration laws, coupled with shared cultural values, brought this community to life. Almost 100 years later, the community is now retiring to the history books.

See on www.washingtonpost.com

July Flashback: Miguel (aka Miguel Jontel Pimentel)(Mexican/African-American) [American]

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Known as: Grammy award winning singer-songwriter, musician & producer

Music Videos: Adorn, Sure Thing, All I Want Is You, Quickie

See on dailymultiracial.com

Interracial Families in 18th Century: A Painting Captures Multiethnic Mexico

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

One of the most typical, revealing products of colonial Spanish culture was the casta painting. This Iberian term means “lineage,” or “race,” and in art refers to the comprehensive representation of mixed-race couples and their offspring. Produced in a series usually consisting of 16 family groups, casta paintings categorize the uniquely complex degree of racial variation that arose within the multiethnic population of the viceroyalty of New Spain, now Mexico. These works were produced almost exclusively in the major artistic and governmental centers of Mexico City and Puebla during the 18th century. About 100 sets of castapaintings survive today from what must once have been a considerably larger number.

See on www.theroot.com