President Obama Explains to Trevor Noah How He Navigates Racial Topics

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Source Diversity Inc

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Multiracial Asian Families: “Passing” “Presenting” & the Troubled Language of Mixed Race

By Sharon H. Chang

 

We use “passes” and “presents” as if multiracial individuals have full say and control over their racialization. When they don’t at all. Could I work to pass as white? Yes. But would it work? Maybe. It all depends on the reader. Meaning this: we only pass when others let us pass. Full agency does not rest with individuals. Similarly when we say someone “presents as” we imply the person is choosing that presentation. Sometimes that’s true. But sometimes that’s not true. For example I often hear adults describe multiracial children as young as infancy as “white presenting.” How in the world is a child less than a year old presenting their race at all? Who is actually presenting their race? WE are. When we assign a description. Regardless of whether the assessment is true, why aren’t we saying “I read the child as white” which claims accountability rather than asserting our perception on someone else and insinuating they made that decision on their own?

Sourced through Scoop.it from: multiasianfamilies.blogspot.com

A detailed and powerful article on who is defining mixed people and the dangers in exclusion. 

 

Also talks about power dynamics that adults have over children and warns about taking away the child’s agency to define themselves. 

Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks

Roland Martin took Stacey Dash to task for her comments about BET and Black networks during Thursday’s edition of NewsOne Now.

 

Click through for [VIDEO]

Sourced through Scoop.it from: newsone.com

How I Learned about the One-Drop Rule: Mark

TRANSCRIPT:

 

FANSHEN: Recently I asked my friends when was the first time that they heard about the one-drop rule. And their answers were really incredible, so we’re sharing them here and we’d like to hear yours. So send us an email (onedropoflove(at)gmail, tweet us, anything, and let us know: when was the first time that YOU learned about the one-drop rule?


MARK
: I self-identify as mixed, but I am politically Black. In our family we never talked about race or the one-drop rule – anything. And so basically I just intuited that there was a one-drop rule because I was defined as Black growing up as far as my experiences.

My dearest friend, growing up, would call me “contraband” because he learned about the phrase – he read something about slavery and that a slave that was seeking freedom, if they were caught they were considered ‘contraband’ and he thought that was funny. I had no knowledge, so he was calling me contraband and it hurt like hell and I had no ability to defend myself or to articulate a different argument.

So it really wasn’t until I graduated from high school, I was in the Marine Corps, I came across an interesting story in the New York Times about a woman who was suing the State of Louisiana because her birth certificate said that she was ‘Colored.’ She was raised White, she self-identified as White. And she fought her case all the way up to the Supreme Court and lost because according to state law, in 1970 if you were just any – any trace of Black, you were Colored to 1/32 Black, you were Colored. And she had 3/32s – they even went so far as to hire a genealogist. And so that fascinated me – it really resonated with me. I couldn’t articulate why, but I just found it a fascinating story.

Ten years later I was attending school at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland and I learned about the one-drop rule. And that’s where I learned about slavery, I learned about Manifest Destiny, etc. etc. etc. And I learned about the one-drop rule and I learned how pernicious and ridiculous it is and how hard we work to create a caste system and what really saddened me was defining Black as a negative – that if you had any part Black in you, that was not a good thing. And that’s…that’s heartbreaking. Nobody should ever have that experience and it will end because of people like Fanshen, who are creating this space for us to talk about elements of racism such as the one-drop rule and I’m very appreciative and have much gratitude for allowing me to share my story of how I learned about the one-drop rule.


SPOKESPERSON
: Don’t forget to subscribe to the channel to keep up with the latestOne Drop news and other videos. Do you have ideas for more video content? Tell us what you’d like to see. We’ll see you next time to share more drops of love. Be sure to tell us by commenting here and on Twitter and Facebook, how YOU are spreading drops of love.

 

From

http://www.onedropoflove.org/how-i-learned-about-the-one-drop-rule-mark/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

Can you believe these two 18-year-old girls are TWINS?

With one sister boasting fair skin with ginger hair and the other having darker skin with curls, you may find it hard to believe these two are twins

Source: www.mirror.co.uk

 

This article is the best!

 

You can see the sisters are the same height, same body shape, same body width, same arm length, same leg length, same almond shaped eyes, same heart shaped head and similar nose.

 

Thank you for sharing Weather Anchor Mama!

 

Click through for more!