Dr. Joy DeGruy – Bulding Bridges – Keynote 2011

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

“Dr. Joy DeGruy (Leary) is a nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author, and presenter. Dr. Joy, as most know her, is an ambassador for healing and a voice for those who’ve struggled in search of the past, and continue to struggle through the present.

 

Dr. DeGruy holds a bachelor of science degree in communications, a master’s degree in social work, a master’s degree in psychology, and a Ph.D. in social work research. She is an assistant professor at Portland State University. She has written many articles and books, including Post-Traumatic Slave Syndrome, which is the basis for her speech today. Her work suggests that centuries of slavery followed by systemic racism and oppression have resulted in multigenerational adaptive behaviors, some of which have been positive and reflective of resilience, and others that are detrimental and destructive. “Healing must occur on multiple levels, because the injury occurred on multiple levels.

 

The Building Bridges Conference, is a student-initiated, student-led diversity conference dedicated to addressing today’s pressing global and social issues. The conference series aims to increase awareness and action through inspirational speakers supplemented by interactive workshops and action steps. This year’s conference, I’m Not For Sale: Slavery Past and Present, will provide a rewarding opportunity to engage in important dialogue regarding slavery—from the historical slave trade to today’s modern society.”

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Dr. Joy Lectures – Videos

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Love my dear sister Dr. Joy DeGruy. 

She speaks the truth and makes it plain. 

See on joydegruy.com

Opinion: What does Blackness look like? – In America – CNN

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

Editor’s note: Yaba Blay, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Africana studies who teaches courses at Lafayette College. Her research focuses on black identity, with specific attention to skin color and hair politics.
Via inamerica.blogs.cnn.com

Whiteness and Our Concerns – William Javier Nelson, Ph.D.

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Via web.archive.org

Jay Fubler Harvey – Creator of Daily Multiracial – on Google+

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Jay Fubler Harvey – Question everything, even yourself…
Via plus.google.com

Redefining their races: More students choosing to identify as mixed – Western Front

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

Via westernfrontonline.net

Skin Bleaching and Global White Supremacy: By Way of Introduction

The cosmetic use of chemical agents to lighten the complexion of one’s skin, also referred to as skin whitening, skin lightening, and/or skin bleaching, is currently a widespread global phenomenon. While the history of skin bleaching can be traced to the Elizabethan age of powder and paint, in its current manifestations, skin bleaching is practiced disproportionately within communities “of color” and exceedingly among people of African descent. While it is true that skin bleaching represents a multifaceted phenomenon, with a complexity of historical, cultural, sociopolitical, and psychological forces motivating the practice, the large majority of scholars who examine skin bleaching at the very least acknowledge the institutions of colonialism and enslavement historically, and global White supremacy contemporarily, as dominant and culpable instigators of the penchant for skin bleaching. As an introduction to this Special Issue of The Journal of Pan African Studies focusing on skin bleaching and global White supremacy, the purpose of this paper is to critically examine the symbolic significance of whiteness, particularly for and among African people, by outlining the history of global White supremacy, both politically and ideologically, discussing its subsequent promulgation, and further investigating its relationship to the historical and contemporary skin bleaching phenomenon.Read the entire article here.
Via www.mixedracestudies.org

New Photo Essay: (1)ne Drop

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

(1)ne Drop seeks to challenge narrow, yet popular perceptions of what “Blackness” is and what “Blackness” looks like
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Education Week: Study Finds Minority Students Get Harsher Punishments

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

A new report finds that African-American and Hispanic students are suspended or expelled more often than white students—even for minor offenses.
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