Dr. Yaba Blay’s take on Beyoncé’s ‘Formation’

“… I cringe when I hear her chant, “You mix that Negro with that Creole make a Texas bamma” about her Alabama-born dad and her mom from Louisiana. This is the same reason I cringed at the L’Oreal ad that identified Beyonce  as African-American, Native American and French.”

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.colorlines.com

 

There is a fine line between affirming mixed race people and bashing mono-race people. 

 

I agree with Dr. Blay’s sentiment.

 

Bragging about being mixed race is akin to bragging about being mono-raced. Race is not a thing to be proud about. It is no accomplishment to be born. A person may prefer a certain skin color, but as Brenda says: Your preference is not preferable.

 

@getgln

This Mocha-Caramel-Honey Post-Racial Fantasy Is Making Me Sick

By Sharon Chang

 

“Are we bingeing on mixed-race beauty to feel better about racism?”

 

Source: www.buzzfeed.com

Insight:

 

This article says so many things I have been thinking.

There is also a thing called beauty privilege, that I do not hear others talking about in that way.

 

The article is excellent and detailed overall.

The one bit I would say differently is where Sharon says:
“We know race is not biological…”.

 

Race is exactly biological. The fact that race is about biology does not need to reinforce racism however. “The Nature of Race”, by Ann Morning goes into this and how different scientists view race differently. The big opposing views are between anthropologists and medical scientists.

 

@getgln

Welcome to Seattle Public Schools. What race are you?

by Sharon H Chang

 

Enrolling your child in Seattle Public Schools means choosing their race and ethnicity from a confounding list of checkboxes.

“This is the first time I’ve seen a form that’s so specific and yet not specific enough,” she criticized, “My reaction at first was amused — as in, ‘Oh, Seattle!’ — and then kind of offended.”


“If we’re going to list separate countries, why not also list Bangladesh and Sri Lanka?” She also questioned “African American/Black” being designated as a single category given that our region represents large communities of Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Somalis.


Then look how choices are grouped. “African-American/Black” (as Gupte observes) but also “White” are weirdly devoid of subcategories.

 

Continue reading…

Source: seattleglobalist.com

Thank you for sharing Sharon H Chang!
When my daughter started kindergarten I asked what happens if I do not complete the race question. I was told the teacher will complete the question for me.
At that time, one check box was allowed. My daughter is being counted as Latina – now in 5th grade.
My son will be counted as both Latino and White. Now we are allowed to check more than one box.
Some reporting recalculates people’s race based on the social construct of hypodescent, so when we read the student’s test scores broken down by race, I still do not know how accurate that data is.
Plus, wouldn’t it also be valuable to report test scores by zip code? Then we could add a library in zip codes that need it most.

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

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Take a tour through America’s immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming

Source: www.vox.com

 

HT @favianna

Fascinating how the U.S. (and the world) is constantly changing and so fast. @getgln

 

 

Bhagat Singh Thind

 

Bhagat Singh Thind(1892-1967), an Indian American spiritual teacher and writer, was denied US citizenship in United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind (1923). The Supreme Court ruled, 9 to 0, that while Thind was arguably Caucasian, he was not white.

 

Community Village‘s insight:

Click through to read the whole article.This story paints the picture of one man’s personal sovereignty, dignity and persistence vs the twisted thinking of U.S. xenophobia. An amazing story that should be made into a movie. @getgln

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Why I Don’t Sleep With White Guys

I live in a predominately white city. Everywhere I went, I was white men’s object (emphasis on object) of desire. I was being objectified, exoticized and sexualized for being one of few coloured girls in a sea of white men.

Community Village‘s insight:

At first I wasn’t going to share this because I didn’t see a photo in the post. However, this post seems to have hit a nerve with a lot of people. When I scooped it, the photo above was pulled in by Scoop.it. I don’t think she’s the author – but it’s a photo 🙂

Here’s my favorite line from this article:

“As a mixed-race girl, I also found it unsettling that the colour of my skin allowed people to label me as “Black,” or as something tropical and exotic — it was always one of the two.”

Emphasis is mine.

@getgln

See on www.huffingtonpost.ca