Understanding Affirmative Action: Part 2 | CHANGELAB

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

“When James Meredith attempted to break the de facto ban on African Americans at the University of Mississippi in 1962, de facto bans against Asian Americans also existed at many colleges and universities. Meredith’s courageous decision was one of the catalytic events of the Civil Rights Movement. In the face of this kind of discrimination and its broad legacy of inequality, affirmative action was a logical demand, won in order to address the (still evident) under-representation of people of color in certain kinds of employment, government contracts, and college admissions.”

– MORE –

Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

…more grey areas to think about to level the playing field.

See on www.changelabinfo.com

Affirmative Action Debate: Tim Wise (3 of 14)

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

The motion: “It’s time to end affirmative action”

Moderator: Robert Siegel
Speaking for the motion: John H. McWhorter, Terence J. Pell and Joseph C. Phillips

Speaking against the motion: Khin Mai Aung, Kimberlé Crenshaw and Tim Wise
See on www.youtube.com

Affirmative Action Debate: Kimberlé Crenshaw (7 of 14)

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

Moderator: Robert Siegel

Speaking for the motion: John H. McWhorter, Terence J. Pell and Joseph C. Phillips

Speaking against the motion: Khin Mai Aung, Kimberlé Crenshaw and Tim Wise
See on www.youtube.com

Will the Supreme Court Reaffirm Affirmative Action? | BillMoyers.com

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

Laura Flanders discusses the Fisher v. University of Texas affirmative action case with Kimberlé Crenshaw and Luke Harris.

400 straight A Black students were rejected from going to UC Berkeley. They only had a 4.0 GPA because there were no AP courses at their high school; so they couldn’t earn a 4.2 GPA

“Last month, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas, which challenges the constitutionality of race-based affirmative action. In 2003, the court decided that race could be considered a factor in college admissions; we’re waiting to find out how today’s more conservative court will rule on the issue. In the meantime, Laura Flanders talks with Kimberlé Crenshaw and Luke Harris, co-founders of the African American Policy Forum, about the case, the precedents, the potential outcomes, their personal stories, and why they believe we still need race-based affirmative action.”

See on billmoyers.com

Dear Native student who was just admitted to college

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

“In life, some people will throw around the term “Affirmative Action” like it’s a dirty word. To them, it means “some people” (ie minorities) get an “unfair advantage” in the admission process. Do you know how much “affirmative action” goes on in admissions offices that has nothing to do with race? Students of alumni (“legacies”), athletes, students from underrepresented states, children of wealthy donors, students from low income backgrounds, women interested in science and engineering, LGBT students, students with disabilities, students who have extraordinary talent in something…I could go on and on…they all get “special” consideration in the admissions process. The goal is to create a well-rounded class that represents many different perspectives, not to be able to say the class has X number of Native American students. You were not admitted to college simply because you are Native.”
Via nativeappropriations.blogspot.fr