The Game We Play

 

For much of my life I hid my identity somewhere comfortably between Mexican and Tejano. As a particularly brown girl with a funny sounding name, I could leave many confused if I started to explain that I am not an immigrant.  Explaining my identity  was so hard for people who assumed my brown skin meant I was not an American. It’s even harder to assuage brown people who think you are “ashamed” of being Mexican when you tell them you are not an immigrant .  My family has been in Texas over 9 generations. We lost our native ways somewhere along the path but not our knowing. We were just fine being called Tejano for the most part… but I am nosy. Questions of  race and identity have always intrigued me so after earning an anthropology  degree, and many life experiences later,  I  know  that there is no need for explanation for what simply is. I am an indigenous women.
For any Hispanic or Latina or even self identified Chicana reading this, I want to tell you this was not easy. You yourself may be struggling with understanding why this should even matter. I want to help you get there if I can.

 

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Source: xicanachronicles.com

 

If you are Latino, how do you self identify when your child is born? If  you don’t indicate Amerindian – is your child’s identity partially lost?

 

 

Light-skinned-ed Girl: Mixed Experience History Month 2014: James Mye

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

James Mye (ca. 1823 – ca. 1890) was a descendant of Africans who escaped slavery in the British colonies and found refuge in Native American communities. He was of Mashpee and African descent. Mye was an indentured servant to the…

See on lightskinnededgirl.typepad.com

The Mestizo Concept: A Product of European Imperialism

“Every mestizo is one less Indian — or one more Indian waiting to reemerge.” – Jose Barreiro, Taino/Guajiro What is the concept of Mestizaje? What are its origins? What role does it have to play i…

See on onkwehonwerising.wordpress.com

Adoption, From a Native American Perspective


“They saw poor people, Indians. My grandmother was a sheepherder, living on an Indian reservation without electricity,” Morrill said. “My relatives couldn’t speak English, so they said— ‘we don’t know if these people are your relatives or not, so we are going to take you.’”Leland was immediately removed from his home and placed with an adoptive couple looking for Native American children to foster and adopt. The day after he was adopted, the family moved to Ontario, Canada, severing all ties Leland had to his biological, Native American family.Not uncommon for the times, before 1978, when Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act, a very high number of Indian children were removed from their homes by public and private agencies and placed in non-Indian foster and adoptive homes or institutions….“From a human trafficking point of view, I was trafficked,” said Morrill. …“They trained us within the Mormon ideology; they thought they were saving us. They thought they were doing the right thing, and from that perspective they were good people. But from a Native American perspective—they were not.”
See on www.tulalipnews.com

Black, White, and Indian: Race and the Unmaking of an American Family: Claudio Saunt

Black, White, and Indian: Race and the Unmaking of an American Family [Claudio Saunt] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Deceit, compromise, and betrayal were the painful costs of becoming American for many families.

See on www.amazon.com

Books : IndiVisible

Twenty-seven passionate essays explore the complex history and contemporary lives of people with a dual heritage that is a little-known part of American culture. Authors from across the Americas share first-person accounts of struggle, adaptation, and survival and examine such diverse subjects as contemporary art, the Cherokee Freedmen issue, and the evolution of jazz and blues. This richly illustrated book brings to light an epic history that speaks to present-day struggles for racial identity and understanding.

See on nmaistore.si.edu

Mexican Women’s Mitochondrial DNA Primarily Native American

For mtDNA variation, some studies have measured Native American, European and African contributions to Mexican and Mexican American populations, revealing 85 to 90% of mtDNA lineages are of Native American origin, with the remainder having European (5-7%) or African ancestry (3-5%).

 

See on nativeheritageproject.com

See on 500nations.us

El DeBarge (African American, English, French Canadian, Native American) [American]

Known as: Grammy Nominated Singer-Songwriter (Former lead singer of the R&B group “DeBarge”)

See on dailymultiracial.com

500 NATIONS

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

After watching the documentary movie 500 Nations I thought there would be a website of the same name that would link to the websites of each Native American website. I couldn’t find it, so I made it myself. You will find the list of Native American sites by nation at the top tab labeled Community Websites.

The movie covers history that I was completely unaware of. It describes the dehumanizing and brutal treatment of Amerindians by European settlers and the horrific imperialist theft and occupation of Amerindian land by Europeans.

Community Village‘s insight:

This site is my most recent and most popular. It took me around half a year to get it to this stage (working part time on it).

Shout out to my niece and professional artist Elizabeth Castro for choosing the right color background. I love the color she picked and I would never have thought to pick that color.

Also shout out to my Elance contractors who helped with the Native American sites by Nation spreadsheet – Cindy Patten, Elle Terry, and Carley D.

And shout out to Maria Lexi who is helping with Twitter engagement and Twiter lists.

@getgln

See on 500nations.us