Multiracial Family Man: On being Afro-Latina, transracial adoption by White farmers, coping with tragic accidents and physical disability, and writing a memoir, with author Lorie Tensen, Ep. 64

Ep. 64: Lorie Tensen is an author. She’s also “bionic.” It’s not hard to see why. Having been dealt a number of challenges in life, she’s rebuilt herself stronger than ever before. She was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 7, 1966. The result of an affair between a married, Black detective and a foreigner: a woman from Honduras. Seven months later, she was adopted into a White, Dutch family and raised in a small, farming community two hours west of the Twin Cities. At the age of 12, Lorie suffered a terrible accident, resulting in the loss of her right hand and lower arm. This led to years of grappling with her own self-image and self-esteem. Later in life, she struggled through college, where her racial background set her apart. Then, she was a single mom working hard to make ends meet. She later married, but the marriage ended in divorce, and Lorie found herself struggling again. But, by focusing on her passion, on raising her kids, and on her goal of giving back, she found herself on the right career path. Hers in an inspirational story, and you can read about it in her memoir: “Taking My Hand Out of My Pocket” available here: http://www.amazon.com/Taking-Hand-Out-My-Pocket/dp/0692266054 For more on host, Alex Barnett, please check out his website: www.alexbarnettcomic.com or visit him on Facebook (www.facebook.com/alexbarnettcomic) or on Twitter at @barnettcomic To subscribe to the Multiracial Family Man, please click here: MULTIRACIAL FAMILY MAN PODCAST Intro and Outro Music is Funkorama by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons – By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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I screamed out loud twice during this podcast. 

 

The meat grinder was horrific, but the comment stating that an Afro-Latino would not want to go to a college that had Black people, that comment cuts deep

 

*crying*

The Emotional Tug of Obama

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

“David Axelrod, one of the chief architects of Obama’s political career, told Calmes: “It doesn’t take a big leap to think that child could be thinking, ‘Maybe I could be here someday.’ This can be such a cynical business, and then there are moments like that that just remind you that it’s worth it.”

 

Axelrod’s words, meanwhile, are a reminder that more than three and a half years after Obama made history as the first black man elected to the presidency, he still presents more than a résumé and an agenda. He still personifies the hope, to borrow a noun that he has used, that we really might evolve into the colorblind, fair-minded country that many of us want. His own saga taps into the larger story of this country’s fitful, unfinished progress toward its stated ideal of equal opportunity.”
See on www.mixedracestudies.org