The Case for Loving: The Fight for Interracial Marriage by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls

 

I fell in love with this book the moment I saw it. The cover itself featuring the entire Loving family in a close embrace, seemingly on Dad’s lap as Mom and Dad exchange a gaze as warm as a hug, emanates warmth and makes me feel a sense of strength and belonging. Right now I let my four-year-old interpret the illustrations and make her own story but I have cleared a center space on one of our bookshelves to present this book and look forward to the day when I will read my daughter the words. Written and illustrated by an interracial wife and husband team—Selina Alko and Sean Qualls— who include their own short bio of being an interracial couple at the end of the book, the narrative weaves the sensitive story of the Loving family from the perspectives of Mildred, Richard, and their children with the harsh facts of U.S.America’s racial history. While the narrative portrays some aspects of the love story between Mildred and Richard, as children read the images and/or words of this picture book, they will connect with the Loving children through the cozy illustrations and narrative lines like “Donald, Peggy, and Sidney had two parents who loved them, and who loved each other.” The third person omniscient narrative voice switches from the children’s perspective to the parents’ to a compassionate voice detailing as delicately as possible, the disturbing realities of Reconstruction Era, Jim Crow, and other racist laws of United States’ history.

 

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Source: mixeddiversityreads.com

 

Perfect post for Valentines day 😀

 

 

My Mom is a Foreigner but Not to Me by Julianne Moore

 

I love this book so very much
I can read it ten good times
She represents a child’s experience
With such cool, catchy rhymes

This book by Julianne Moore, primarily written in ABCB rhyming quatrain stanzas, is a first person narrative from the perspective of a dozen different children, which talks about the varied experiences of a child living in the U.S. with a mother from another country. The illustrator, Meilo So has chosen a “framed” illustration style which, other than the fact that it leaves a lot of white space on the page is successful at providing images for many different aspects of the “story” simultaneously.

 

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Source: mixeddiversityreads.com

(1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race: A Review and Reflection

Yaba Blay’s (1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race (2014) is a beautiful, first-hand look at the true complexities surrounding the ways in which societies and peoples racialize one another and the w…

See on andrewpegoda.com

Review: The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing

In summary, this book does an excellent job at getting readers to revisit their own perceptions of race, whether they consider themselves mixed race or not. The categorization and labels that we use to describe us have a confusing and sometimes bright,sometimes painful history that we need to share in order to have a brighter future. You will need your “thinking cap” on because the book uses college-level vocabulary and historical anecdotes, but your mind will be blown away by the complexity behind even the simplest answers involving identity, love, and society.

See on thiscollegedropout.wordpress.com

Mixed Race Studies » Scholarly Perspectives on Mixed-Race » Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance

In a vibrant blend of social history and biography, award-winning writer Carla Kaplan offers a joint portrait of six iconoclastic women who risked ostracism to follow their inclinations—and raised hot-button issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality in the bargain. Returning Miss Anne to her rightful place in the interracial history of the Harlem Renaissance, Kaplan’s formidable work remaps the landscape of the 1920s, alters our perception of this historical moment, and brings Miss Anne to vivid life.

See on www.mixedracestudies.org

Mixed Race Studies » Scholarly Perspectives on Mixed-Race » Multiple Social Categorization: Processes, Models and Applications

Social categorization, how we classify ourselves and others, exerts a profound influence on our thoughts, beliefs, feelings, and behaviors. In this volume, Richard Crisp and Miles Hewstone bring together a selection of leading figures in the social sciences to focus on a rapidly emerging, but critically important, new question: how, when, and why do people classify others along multiple dimensions of social categorization? The volume also explores what this means for social behavior, and what implications multiple and complex perceptions of category membership might have for reducing prejudice, discrimination, and social exclusion.

See on www.mixedracestudies.org

Book Review: Land of the Cosmic Race: Race Mixture, Racism and Blackness in Mexico

Land of the Cosmic Race is a richly-detailed ethnographic account of the powerful role that race and colour play in organizing the lives and thoughts of ordinary Mexicans. It presents a previously untold story of how individuals in contemporary urban Mexico construct their identities, attitudes, and practices in the context of a dominant national belief system. Carefully presented and self-consciously written, this is an excellent book for anyone with an interest in how Mexican racial politics can be seen to operate on the ground, finds Zalfa Feghali.

See on blogs.lse.ac.uk

Books on American history

The perfect American history book would be produced by five historians: a Black American, a Native American, a White American, an Asian American and a Latino American. They would each have equal editorial control, with the Native American as the head.

Community Village‘s insight:

I have read Nell Irvin Painter’s book “The History of White People” and can attest that she’s a great writer who provides a good amount of detail while being accessible at the same time. When I say accessible, I mean she doesn’t write only at the level of genius professor.

I have a different James W. Loewen book called “Teaching What Really Happened”. I haven’t finished it yet but what I have read is really good. He has other books I want to read: Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism; The Mississippi Chinese : Between Black and White.
All his books have around four out of five stars on Amazon:

I have heard good things about “Occupied America: A History of Chicanos”. It has around 4 stars on Amazon and is in it’s 7th edition now.

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Notorious in the Neighborhood with Joshua Rothman, Ph.D.

Notorious in the Neighborhood Sex and Families Across the Color Line in Virginia, 1787-1861 “Laws and cultural norms militated against interracial sex in Virginia before the Civil War.

See on www.blogtalkradio.com