How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

 

Race-in-America

How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity.

Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scriptswhich highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.amazon.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Susan Straight on the lessons of the mixed-race novel

The novelist Susan Straight is uniquely positioned to write about being mixed race in America, even though she’s not mixed race herself. She had three children with her former husband, who is black.

See on www.latimes.com

Jean Toomer’s Conflicted Racial Identity

He probably wanted to live as he pleased, outside the strictures of segregation; to be judged as a writer for his talents alone. And who can blame him?

See on chronicle.com

The Tragic Mulatto Myth

Lydia Maria Child introduced the literary character that we call the tragic mulatto1 in two short stories: “The Quadroons” (1842) and “Slavery’s Pleasant Homes” (1843). She portrayed this light skinned woman as the offspring of a white slaveholder and his black female slave. This mulatto’s life was indeed tragic. She was ignorant of both her mother’s race and her own. She believed herself to be white and free. Her heart was pure, her manners impeccable, her language polished, and her face beautiful. Her father died; her “negro blood” discovered, she was remanded to slavery, deserted by her white lover, and died a victim of slavery and white male violence. A similar portrayal of the near-white mulatto appeared in Clotel(1853), a novel written by black abolitionist William Wells Brown.

See on www.ferris.edu

Mixed Race Studies » Scholarly Perspectives on Mixed-Race » Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance

In a vibrant blend of social history and biography, award-winning writer Carla Kaplan offers a joint portrait of six iconoclastic women who risked ostracism to follow their inclinations—and raised hot-button issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality in the bargain. Returning Miss Anne to her rightful place in the interracial history of the Harlem Renaissance, Kaplan’s formidable work remaps the landscape of the 1920s, alters our perception of this historical moment, and brings Miss Anne to vivid life.

See on www.mixedracestudies.org

Books on American history

The perfect American history book would be produced by five historians: a Black American, a Native American, a White American, an Asian American and a Latino American. They would each have equal editorial control, with the Native American as the head.

Community Village‘s insight:

I have read Nell Irvin Painter’s book “The History of White People” and can attest that she’s a great writer who provides a good amount of detail while being accessible at the same time. When I say accessible, I mean she doesn’t write only at the level of genius professor.

I have a different James W. Loewen book called “Teaching What Really Happened”. I haven’t finished it yet but what I have read is really good. He has other books I want to read: Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism; The Mississippi Chinese : Between Black and White.
All his books have around four out of five stars on Amazon:

I have heard good things about “Occupied America: A History of Chicanos”. It has around 4 stars on Amazon and is in it’s 7th edition now.

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Race in Young Adult Lit: Wake Up & Smell the Coffee-Colored Skin, White Authors!

In a new series entitled Y.A. for Grownups, The Atlantic Wire posted an article exploring The Ongoing Problem of Race in YA. Like the title states, race in YA isn’t a new problem, nor is it going a…

See on sarahockler.com

The Ongoing Problem of Race in Young Adult Literature

In 1965, 11 years after the Supreme Court outlawed segregated schools, Nancy Larrick wrote an article titled “The All-White World of Children’s Books” for the Saturday Review. Much has changed since then.

See on www.theatlanticwire.com

Albert Murray, author who drew on the free-wheeling spirit of jazz, dies at 97

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Mr. Murray’s works underscored how black culture and the blues were braided into American life.

See on www.washingtonpost.com