The Rosa Parks Story

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks was the greatest, most distinguished African American Woman Civil Rights Activist of our time. The woman known as “the first lady of civil rights” was born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama to James McCauley and Leona Edwards, her parents, a carpenter and a teacher, respectively. Her ancestry was a mixture of African American, Cherokee-Creek and Scots-Irish, which some say accounts for her fair complexion. In 1932, Rosa married Raymond Parks, a barber from Montgomery, at her mother’s house.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: thoughtprovokingperspectives.co

Going Multiracial -Rinku Sen

Rinku Sen
Rinku Sen

The demands of the March on Washington weren’t about reshuffling the racial order; they repudiated racial hierarchy: http://t.co/M9hiyqxJmX — Rinku Sen (@racialjustice) August 26, 2013

“If our goal is indeed to take the racial order apart rather than just to make it work for one group or another, everyone with a stake in the American race debate has to be engaged.” -Rinku Sen

Building a New Racial Justice Movement – COLORLINES

Creating a multiracial movement for justice requires more than slapping the word “new” in front of “civil rights movement.”

“…in the main, we don’t want to talk about race, much less about racism. Our societal silence makes room for inventive new forms of discrimination, while it blocks our efforts to change rules that disadvantage people of color. Unless we say what we mean, we cannot redefine how racism works or drive the debate toward equity.”

by Rinku Sen

Community Village‘s insight:

In this article Rinku covers:

  • The Need for Plain Speech
  • Justice and Rights Aren’t the Same
  • Going Multiracial

See on colorlines.com

Three Things Asian Americans Owe to the Civil Rights Movement

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Here are three among many debts Asian Americans owe to the Civil Rights Movement:

Ending bans on interracial marriage: 36% of Asian women and 28% of Asians overall entered into interracial marriages in the U.S. in 2010, making us the most likely to marry outside our race among all groups in that year. These marriages might never have been possible if not for the Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, Loving v. Virginia, a case brought in 1967 by a white man and a black woman, ended the ban on all interracial marriages in the U.S. The Lovings were supported in their case by many civil rights groups, including the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Japanese American Citizens League.

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U.S. immigration histories of the majority of Asian Americans begin after 1965

Community Village‘s insight:

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See on www.changelabinfo.com

Martin Luther King, Jr: “Where Do We Go From Here?”

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

“Where Do We Go From Here?” (August 16th 1967) was a speech Martin Luther King, Jr gave before the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).”

– MORE –

Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

MLK day – Respect

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Understanding Affirmative Action: Part 2 | CHANGELAB

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

“When James Meredith attempted to break the de facto ban on African Americans at the University of Mississippi in 1962, de facto bans against Asian Americans also existed at many colleges and universities. Meredith’s courageous decision was one of the catalytic events of the Civil Rights Movement. In the face of this kind of discrimination and its broad legacy of inequality, affirmative action was a logical demand, won in order to address the (still evident) under-representation of people of color in certain kinds of employment, government contracts, and college admissions.”

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Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

…more grey areas to think about to level the playing field.

See on www.changelabinfo.com

Civil Rights Memorial | Southern Poverty Law Center

Via Scoop.itCommunityVillage

The Civil Rights Memorial honors the achievements and memory of those who died during the Civil Rights Movement, a period framed by the momentous Brown v. Board decision in 1954 and the assassination of Dr.
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