Marissa Johnson

Marissa Janae Johnson (1991?- ), a Black American civil rights leader, is a founder of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) chapter in Seattle. She is best known nationally for stopping Bernie Sanders from giving a speech in Seattle on August 8th 2015.


Bernie Sanders
 is the most “progressive” (liberal or left-leaning) of those running for US president. He is a White senator from the second Whitest state in the nation. As Johnson rightly notes, he is a class reductionist, making policies that address issues of class in place of race.


Sanders had been interrupted by BLM protesters before
. On July 18th at aNetroots Nation gathering in Arizona, they challenged him and fellow presidential candidate Martin O’Malley to make public their policies on structural racism. O’Malley did that a few days later. Sanders did not.

 

 

She now sees it as her duty to make people uncomfortable about living in a racist society.

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And So the Search Begins: What’s the Trouble? Part 2

By Michel Beller

(Above:   My beautiful parents on their wedding day, 1958: another black-white marriage, 150 years later, when it was still illegal to “miscegenate” in 16 states)

 

I chose, as the title for this book, The Trouble with Virginia, because it fits so perfectly. Virginia is my great-great grandmother’s name.  She was born in Virginia. Of a white father and a black mother living openly as husband and wife in the South, in 1830. Plenty of trouble there–need I say more? Imagine navigating a world, a society, a culture such as what mixed-race Virginia (and others like her) must have encountered.

 

Continue reading

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Should Children be Racialized?

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The No Child Left Behind Act requires children’s race with test scores to be tallied so that no race is left behind. I have always thought test scores should be tallied by zip code, not by race. But maybe, as Dr. Cornel West alludes to, maybe students should not be tested at all. He says that rich students are taught and poor students are tested.

When my daughter entered kindergarten the race question was on the registration form. I asked the secretary what would happen if I left the race question blank. She said the teacher would fill in the race question for me, because it is required by law. So, my wife and I decided to fill in Latina (only one race was allowed at the time). However, they have since changed the rules and now allow more than one race to be checked, so my son will be tallied as Latino & White.

I used to be completely against all these race labels, but I found out (thank you Steven Riley of Mixed Race Studies) that the 1964 Civil Rights Act requires tracking race in order to track disparities in hiring, and housing discrimination. And the Southern Poverty Law Center has filed law suites based on racial discrimination. They have found that schools punish Black and Latino students more harshly (suspension) for the same infraction where White and Asian students are not punished with suspension.

PS – the day my children were born we were asked what race we are so it could be marked down on our children’s birth certificates. We live in California. The law may be different in different states. I seem to recall that sometimes that parent’s race is put down, sometimes the children’s race is put down. I’m not sure that there is a state where no race is put down. Also, if you were not asked about race, the nurse may have looked at you, your spouse, and your child and wrote it down without asking.

 

American Revolutionary: Grace Lee Boggs

 

Grace Lee Boggs, 99, is a Chinese American philosopher, writer, and activist in Detroit with a thick FBI file and a surprising vision of what an American revolution can be. Rooted for 75 years in the labor, civil rights and Black Power movements, she challenges a new generation to throw off old assumptions, think creatively and redefine revolution for our times.

 

Click through for VIDEO

 

Source: www.pbs.org

American Revolutionary: Grace Lee Boggs

 

Grace Lee Boggs, 99, is a Chinese American philosopher, writer, and activist in Detroit with a thick FBI file and a surprising vision of what an American revolution can be. Rooted for 75 years in the labor, civil rights and Black Power movements, she challenges a new generation to throw off old assumptions, think creatively and redefine revolution for our times.

 

Click through for VIDEO

 

Source: www.pbs.org

 

Wisdom

 

Justice 4 Trayvon Supporters Shut Down Multiple Freeways

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

Photos, Videos, Tweets

Oakland, LA, Houston

Community Village‘s insight:

Standing up (UNARMED) to the oppressive systemic racist industrial complex of the US

#Justice4Trayvon #NoJusticeNoPeace

See on communityvillageus.blogspot.com

Stormé DeLarverie (Black/White) [American]

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Known as: Legendary Drag Performer & Stonewall Riot Veteran (The only Drag King of the legendary drag troupe “The Jewel Box” revue; Known as the “Stonewall Lesbian”; Sometimes referred to as the “Gay Community’s Rosa Parks”; Stormé was the topic of numerous documentaries including “Stormé: The Lady of the Jewel Box”)

See on dailymultiracial.com

Martin Luther King, Jr: “Where Do We Go From Here?”

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

“Where Do We Go From Here?” (August 16th 1967) was a speech Martin Luther King, Jr gave before the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).”

– MORE –

Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

MLK day – Respect

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Understanding Affirmative Action: Part 2 | CHANGELAB

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

“When James Meredith attempted to break the de facto ban on African Americans at the University of Mississippi in 1962, de facto bans against Asian Americans also existed at many colleges and universities. Meredith’s courageous decision was one of the catalytic events of the Civil Rights Movement. In the face of this kind of discrimination and its broad legacy of inequality, affirmative action was a logical demand, won in order to address the (still evident) under-representation of people of color in certain kinds of employment, government contracts, and college admissions.”

– MORE –

Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

…more grey areas to think about to level the playing field.

See on www.changelabinfo.com

Book Review: American Indians, American Justice (ISBN 029273834x)

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Title: American Indians, American Justice (ISBN 029273834x)

Author: Vine Deloria, Jr.; Clifford M. Lytle

Available: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Prairie Edge Trading Company & Galleries

Review Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Summary: For me personally, it is a sad note that my awareness of Native American/American Indian history stopped after the Battle of Wounded Knee. It wasn’t intentional. It was just that my history books just stopped there. I knew that Native Americans history continued after that, but never really heard of anything even close to the complex political and legal history of these great people. Reading American Indians, American Justice (1983) helped me to realize the depths of that ignorance.

The book starts with the legal question of how Europeans were to interact with native people who already lived there. The answer to that question is still being answered today. The first chapter outlines the overall history of key legislation and policies regarding land rights, self-government, and tribal jurisdiction with the rest of the chapters discussing various aspects of that history with more involved discussion. Some of the topics discussed include:

  • The definition and legal use of the concept of “Indian country”
  • Past and current tribal governments including the judicial system, jurisdiction, criminal system, and their civil liberties (free speech, religion, rights of the criminally accused)
  • History of the political agencies that deal or have dealt with the Native Americans

Throughout the journey, the authors take you through an astounding number of laws and policies, taking time to provide examples and cases where these laws came into use. In their analysis, you come to see the complexities and nuances the American government has had in interacting with Native Americans. The book then shifts toward the legal system set up by the tribal governments (under the auspices of the United States), providing critiques and analysis, finally ending with a discussion of public policies and civil rights of Americans.

Commentary: This book was definitely an eye-opener. As I stated earlier, I had little knowledge of Native American governments in the past or in the present. Most U.S. history books only focused on aspects of Native Americans with little concern to their legal and political history. Some things I was astounded to learn:

  • Native Americans were not considered citizens by virtue of 14th Amendment
  • There is a series of (complex) laws that determine if a situation falls under tribal jurisdiction, US federal jurisdiction, or both, which often lead to confusing consequences
  • There was a Native American Civil Rights Act of 1968  (Link: http://www.tribal-institute.org/lists/icra1968.htm)
  • The United States government attempted to allocate land, similar to what had been offered Black Americans
    (Link: http://academic.udayton.edu/race/02rights/native08.htm)
  • Native Americans have a long standing tradition of governments that worked in various ways. These governments have been adapted, but do not mirror, the American government system.

The book offers many insights for people unfamiliar with Native American law and policy. It is not a particularly long book (around 250 pages), if you find the material interesting. The book is geared toward the law or policy student, so it helps to be comfortable with the presentation of a lot of laws, statues, legal terms, and analysis. This book does not cover only legal or policy issues, but those serve as the foundation of the study. It’s similar to the Bruce Jansson’s book “The Reluctant Welfare State” with a more legal twist.