Senate passes sweeping immigration bill

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

The Senate passes a sweeping immigration reform bill, but House Republicans call it a nonstarter.

See on edition.cnn.com

CNN DIALOGUES: The 2010 Census and the New America

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

CNN DIALOGUES: The 2010 Census and the New America If numbers don’t lie, what can the 2010 U.S. Census tell us about who we are and how we live? On August 31…

Community Village‘s insight:

Heidi Durrow posted this on her Google+ page.
Thank you Heidi!

See on www.youtube.com

Wetback, Mulatto, whatever….

bb

So again yesterday, at zero-dark-thirty, I’m running around. Oops, forgot it was Easter weekend and I have a bazillion things to do. CNN is on and I vaguely hear something about a “Representative” (Don Young (R) – Alaska, to be exact) calling Latinos “wetbacks”. Work, laundry, grocery store, wait a minute. Wetbacks? Really? An elected official no less? From the party that just got its butt beat, because of their insensitivity? Really? This morning, a little more clear-headed, I search for “Congressman, wetbacks” and read the whole sordid little story.

A term that was originally used to describe Mexicans that came across the border into Texas via the Rio Grande River it made me think about a term that I absolutely hate…..mulatto. The first time I was called one, I was in junior high school and someone called me a mulatto with such affection, I thought, that’s cute….tomayto, tomato, potayto, potato, mulatto. But as I grew older, and saw the disdain that people would pronounce the word….moooolattoe…..like it was an exotic, too bitter coffee from Marrakesh…I began to not like the word.
I am tired of the labels that people have to put on others to make themselves feel better. I am saddened that our elected officials continue to make choices that are divisive, especially when talking about those who are from other places, backgrounds or ideologies. Hopefully, somewhere in our future , people will realize that we are all human, and not the derogatory labels they choose to put on us. Peace, bb.

Did one-drop rules have a positive side?

OneDropRule_CNN[Transcription by Steven F. Riley]

Soledad O’Brien: Why do so many black people—me included—embrace the “one-drop rule” when it really, literally, has its roots in terrible things?

Yaba Blay: Again, I think because the “one-drop rule,” in as much as it was oppressive, protected us.  It gave us an identity in the same way that when we talk about white parents of mixed-race kids, you know, and you’ll hear a lot of white parents say, “oh my child can choose to be whatever they want to be.” And then you see the child struggling. That there’s some comfort and there’s some strength that comes with being told what you are. And so I think the “one-drop rule” gave us a definition of blackness that was unquestionable. There was no space to be mixed-race, biracial, any of these things. And from that, we were able to mobilize, right, in the fight against Jim Crow; in the fight against segregation; in the fight against racism. That, again it gave us the parameters for what our community ultimately was.

Source: Mixed Race Studies

Who Is Black In America? Soledad O’Brien, CNN Find Out In ‘BIA 5′

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Navarrow Wright

 

This Sunday at 8 p.m., CNN airs its fifth installment of the “Black In America” series, which is hosted by Soledad O’Brien. In this episode, O’Brien asks the question, “Who is Black in America?” as they tackle the issues of colorism and racial identity. The documentary centers around young women who are part of a poetry program in Philly who are dealing with these issues. I had the opportunity to sit down with Soledad to get her take on what may be one of the most talked about “Black in America” episodes yet.

 

[Note from Steven F. Riley: Ms. O’Brien also mentions what topics are not discussed in the hour-long documentary.]

See on www.mixedracestudies.org

The dismantling of Mexican-American studies in Tucson schools – In America – CNN

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Update: Congressional Hispanic Caucus want an investigation into Tucson’s ethnic studies ban By Stephanie Siek, CNN (CNN) —  Nearly two weeks since Tucson, Arizona’s, Mexican-American studies classes were suspended, some books have been removed…
Via inamerica.blogs.cnn.com

Don Lemon: Legacy of ‘one drop’ rule inspires search for family history

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

Editor’s note: Don Lemon anchors CNN Newsroom during weekend prime-time and serves as a correspondent across CNN’s U.S. programming.
Via inamerica.blogs.cnn.com

Don Lemon: It only takes one drop – In America

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

Via inamerica.blogs.cnn.com

Teaching Children To Respect One Another

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Has anyone seen research where the researcher asks children, instead of a closed ended question like “Who is the smart one” but instead “Are all phenotypes equally nice and equally smart?” (Children may not know what a phenotype is but that creates a good opportunity to explain that a phenotype is only skin deep). Children can then be asked to explain their answer and where they learned their knowledge or stereotypes. Maybe they learned it from TV, radio, friends, students, family or even their parents. -more-
Via getglennrobinson.blogspot.com