Why Racial Justice Work Needs to Address Settler Colonialism and Native Rights

How can we include settler colonialism in our work – especially as it relates to racism against non-Native people of color? It’s complicated, but this article’s got some crucial answers.

 

  1. Understand Racism and Settler Colonialism as Connected Forms of Oppression
  2. Examine How Settler Colonialism Creates Tensions Between Anti-Racism Work and Decolonization
  3. Learn That If You’re on US Land, You’re Complicit in Settler Colonialism

 

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  1. Rethinking My Own History of Migration (And My Relationships with Land and Space)
  2. Learning Ways to Stand in Solidarity with Pacific Islanders
  3. Working on Crossing My Privilege Line

 

Continue reading

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: everydayfeminism.com

The Colonialism That is Settled and the Colonialism That Never Happened

Decolonization

by Andrea Smith

While both Black and Native studies scholars have rightfully argued that it is important to look at the distinctness of both anti-Blackness and Indigenous genocide, sometimes this focus on the distinctness obscures how, in fact, they are mutually reinforcing. There is much to be said about these interconnections, and this work has been explored by many in this blog series, in the #decolonizesaam Twitter discussion on anti-Blackness, and elsewhere. Here, I want to focus on how anti-Blackness and Indigenous genocide are connected through colonialism, and further expand on how colonialism constructs both the labor of Indigenous and Black peoples, in particular and different ways, in order to secure the settler state. In this article I want to focus on how settler colonialism is enabled through the erasure of colonialism against Black peoples as well as the erasure of Indigenous labor, with a particular emphasis on some of…

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Tufts creates consortium for race, colonialism and diaspora – The Tufts Daily

Tufts officially launched the Consortium of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora (RCD), an interdisciplinary program linking Africana Studies, American Studies, Asian American Studies, Colonialism Studies and Latino Studies, this summer. The program’s Inaugural Celebration and Plenary, featuring a discussion with program directors, was held last night. Associate Professor of History Kris Manjapra said that RCD was …

Source: tuftsdaily.com

The Mestizo Concept: A Product of European Imperialism

“Every mestizo is one less Indian — or one more Indian waiting to reemerge.” – Jose Barreiro, Taino/Guajiro What is the concept of Mestizaje? What are its origins? What role does it have to play i…

See on onkwehonwerising.wordpress.com

Tainos

The Taínos (tah-EE-noes), commonly called the Arawak Indians, were the main people who lived in the Caribbean when Columbus arrived in 1492. They are the ones he called “Indians”, thinking he was i…

Community Village‘s insight:
Many Spanish settlers took Taino wives. They brought in African slaves to take the place of dead Taino workers. Today Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are, genetically and culturally, mostly a mix of Spanish, Taino and West African:
  • Puerto Rico: genetically 10% to 15% Taino”

See on abagond.wordpress.com

Race Basics: Colonialism and Religious Bigotry

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

“I don’t play in the oppression Olympics. Yet, I’ve argued that anti-black racism is the fulcrum of white supremacy. This statement has generated some controversy, with some saying I’ve overlooked Native people, and others saying there is a hierarchy of oppressions in which Blacks suffer most.

 

 

While Africans were profiled as animals to justify race slavery, Native Americans were profiled as anti-Christians to justify wars over land and resources. Today’s debates over the dominance of Christianity in our politics echo this history. Religious bigotry continues to drive the expansion of American empire in the form of the war on terror/Islam. And, that war is part of a larger culture “war” that is knocking down rights of LGBT people, women, and religious minorities.”
See on racefiles.wordpress.com