Q&A With Prof. Jennifer Lee: Asian American Success Isn’t What You Think It Is

Pop culture often portrays Asian Americans as successful because of strict parenting or just plain hard work. But a new book debunks the “model minority” myth, revealing the way government policies have actually skewed those perceptions. I recently interviewed Jennifer Lee, professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine, and co-author of The Asian American Achievement Paradox about her research.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.blogher.com

White People | Official Full Documentary | MTV

What does it mean to be white? MTV’s ‘White People’ is a groundbreaking documentary on race that aims to answer that question from the viewpoint of young white people living in America today. The film follows Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and filmmaker, Jose Antonio Vargas, as he travels across the country to get this complicated conversation started. ‘White People’ asks what’s fair when it comes to affirmative action, if colorblindness is a good thing, what privilege really means, and what it’s like to become the “white minority” in your neighborhood. For more information on ‘White People,’ and to join the conversation, head to race.lookdifferent.org

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

To understand Mixed American Live it helps to understand what it means to be White.

 

#Whiteness

#WhiteStudies

Poor kids, rich schools – Where are you from? What do your parents do?

In his first few weeks as a freshman at the University of Chicago, Calvin Cottrell was constantly being asked the same questions: Where are you from? What do your parents do?

“I found those conversations kind of hostile, as the first person in my family to go to college. If you’re living with a roommate whose parents are heart surgeons from Connecticut, that feels very different,” he said.

Source: money.cnn.com

After college the questions become, “Where do you live?” and “What do you do?”

#identity

Critical Ethnic Studies MA Degree – DePaul University

DePaul University’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences is pleased to offer the first graduate program in a new and exciting field that utilizes Chicago as a living classroom. 

The Master of Arts in Critical Ethnic Studies prepares students for advanced analysis of race and ethnicity in an urban and global context. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to the studies of systematic marginalization of racialized minorities. It also looks at how racialized groups respond to and counter these forces through art, culture, political organization and other forms of social citizenship. 
We emphasize social justice and transformation while focusing on U.S. ethno-racial populations through an intersectional, transnational, and urban framework. Students apply critical theories to complex social and cultural issues. The program consists of a combination of core courses and electives and a final project or internship.

Source: las.depaul.edu

Notes towards a Chicano history of the US

 

Schools in the US teach a White or Anglo American history of the country. Because of White guilt it is full of lies, half-truths and stuff left out. There is much to learn and unlearn:

 

– Click through to read more –

 

Source: abagond.wordpress.com

Light-skinned-ed Girl: Mixed Experience History Month 2014: Yung Wing, pioneering educator

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Yung Wing (1828-1912) was the first Chinese person to graduate from an American college. Wing was born in southern China in 1828. He was the son of poor farmers who decided to send him to a missionary school to improve…

See on lightskinnededgirl.typepad.com

Georgia school hosts first racially integrated prom

Last week, for the first time in decades, students from Wilcox County, Georgia, attended a school-sponsored prom that was open to all students rather than a private, racially segregated prom.

See on www.cnn.com

The Multicultural Doctorate: Why Mixed Race Discussions Matter

“Mixed race is a significant identity in our race-obsessed society. It causes that extra level of ambivalence, that extra set of questions about identity. It is similar in some ways to the immigrant American experience for example, however, being mixed adds another level of scrutiny. ”

See on themulticulturaldoctorate.blogspot.com

Changes in UW-Madison’s Afro-American studies would reflect multi-racial society

“Black people, brown people, religion, immigration are the most important topics to understanding U.S. culture now, Werner said.”

 

See on host.madison.com