How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

 

Race-in-America

How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity.

Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scriptswhich highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

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HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Tech leaders make immigration a moral issue, not an economic one

LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman runs into a problem when he advocates for immigration reform in Washington. Yet the tech sector has failed to win over Washington — despite multimillion-dollar advocacy campaigns. With the composition of the Republican-led House, which has blocked immigration reform, unlikely to change in 2016, their current strategy won’t work. Instead of using typical techie metrics-speak to explain how granting legal status to the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants

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HT @Kfaragon

Silicon Valley Mayors Call for Immigration Reform

The mayors of Cupertino, San Jose, Santa Clara, Fremont, and East Palo Alto come together to talk about the important impact immigrants have had on their cit…

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Documentary about Dr. Favianna Rodriguez’s work nominated for an Emmy

Favianna Rodriguez is a visual artist and community organizer who merges her artistic practice with political activism. Through her bold, vivid artwork, she has become a leading voice in raising awareness about immigration, women’s issues, globalization and economic injustice.

 

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200 Years of U.S. Immigration, in 1 Colorful Infographic

By Tanvi Misra

In 1819, Congress passed a law requiring that the arrival of all immigrants be recorded. Immigrant workers were needed, and the rest of the 19th century saw their numbers grow. From that period through today, America has seen waves of immigration, which Natalia Bronshtein has captured in a colorful interactive graphic.

Continue reading…

Source: communityvillageus.blogspot.com

Almost All Aliens: Immigration, Race and Colonialism in American History and Identity

 

Book Description from Amazon:

“Almost All Aliens offers a unique reinterpretation of immigration in the history of the United States. Leaving behind the traditional melting-pot model of immigrant assimilation, Paul Spickard puts forward a fresh and provocative reconceptualization that embraces the multicultural reality of immigration that has always existed in the United States. His astute study illustrates the complex relationship between ethnic identity and race, slavery, and colonial expansion. Examining not only the lives of those who crossed the Atlantic, but also those who crossed the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the North American Borderlands, Almost All Aliens provides a distinct, inclusive analysis of immigration and identity in the United States from 1600 until the present.”

 

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Source: communityvillageus.blogspot.com

 

HT Sharon H Chang @multiasianfams

 

Migrant Child Labor in the United States [VIDEO]

 

Posted on July 21, 2010 by WITNESS


This post was written by Chanchala Gunewardena
, (Clark University 2011), Summer 2010 intern in WITNESS’ Communications department.

Last Thursday, WITNESS was invited to The Paley Center for Media for a screening of a special segment of NBC’s Dateline, titled America Now: Children of the Harvest. This piece, a follow up to a 1998 Emmy Award winning report on migrant farm workers and their families, attempts to see, what has developed and changed in the lives of a particular group of people twelve years on. More specifically however, it is focused on the issue of child labor, as migrant families who work in the agricultural sector tend to be assisted in their work by their whole family, including children under the legal working age (for this specific sector) of twelve.

 

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Source: blog.witness.org