Taino Rising

Over 30,000 strong, the Taino Peoples are gathering momentum towards achieving inherently deserved recognition as part of the larger trajectory of re-claiming explicit community and individual rights to self-determination and sovereignty within…

See on intercontinentalcry.org

Thanksgiving Conundrum

“Justin Petrone, like me, is a mixed race person with Native American ancestry, although unlike me, initially, he never thought of himself in those terms.  I’ve always known and since I was a child, self-identified myself in that way.  Like me, Justin has spent years searching for his elusive ancestors, more often than not, hidden in the mists of time with only suggestions of who their ancestors are by words on tax lists and census records like “free person of color.”

Most of the time, Native people were transparent, until they became at least “civilized” enough to be counted on the census, or taxed or they did something else to bring them into the white man’s realm.  More recently, Justin and others like us have been able to confirm, or deny, that heritage via DNA testing.  So even if we don’t know exactly who our ancestor is, we are positive THAT our Native heritage is real.  In some cases, through DNA testing we can learn which of our ancestral lines is Native.”

See on nativeheritageproject.com

Tainos

The Taínos (tah-EE-noes), commonly called the Arawak Indians, were the main people who lived in the Caribbean when Columbus arrived in 1492. They are the ones he called “Indians”, thinking he was i…

Community Village‘s insight:
Many Spanish settlers took Taino wives. They brought in African slaves to take the place of dead Taino workers. Today Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are, genetically and culturally, mostly a mix of Spanish, Taino and West African:
  • Puerto Rico: genetically 10% to 15% Taino”

See on abagond.wordpress.com

500 NATIONS

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

After watching the documentary movie 500 Nations I thought there would be a website of the same name that would link to the websites of each Native American website. I couldn’t find it, so I made it myself. You will find the list of Native American sites by nation at the top tab labeled Community Websites.

The movie covers history that I was completely unaware of. It describes the dehumanizing and brutal treatment of Amerindians by European settlers and the horrific imperialist theft and occupation of Amerindian land by Europeans.

Community Village‘s insight:

This site is my most recent and most popular. It took me around half a year to get it to this stage (working part time on it).

Shout out to my niece and professional artist Elizabeth Castro for choosing the right color background. I love the color she picked and I would never have thought to pick that color.

Also shout out to my Elance contractors who helped with the Native American sites by Nation spreadsheet – Cindy Patten, Elle Terry, and Carley D.

And shout out to Maria Lexi who is helping with Twitter engagement and Twiter lists.

@getgln

See on 500nations.us

Watch the 2013 State of Indian Nations Address – COLORLINES

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

Last Thursday, Jefferson Keel , president of the D.C.-based National Congress of American Indian, delivered the annual State of Indian Nations Address….

Glenn Robinson‘s insight:

“…60% of Native women are married to non-Native men…”

See on colorlines.com

Native American and American Ideas of Land

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

Clashing ideas of these two groups of land and possession clash as the Americans push further out west.

See on www.scoop.it

Native Appropriations: Idle No More Los Angeles Solidarity Rally

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

“I wanted to try something different to share my experience at the Idle No More solidarity rally in LA on Friday, so I made a podcast-of-sorts. I give some thoughts on the Idle No More movement, a little background, and set the scene. But then, the exciting part, I was able to interview some awesome folks at the rally: Andrea Landry, Crystle Lightning,Adam Beach (yes, ADAM BEACH), and Kevin Gonzaga. The podcast is about 20 minutes long, and the interviews give background on the movement and legislation in Canada, Chief Theresa Spence’s hunger strike, what this means for Native people in the US, how these rallies and collective action are changing perceptions of Indigenous Peoples, and what the role of settler allies (non-Native allies) can be in the movement. Some really good stuff in their own words. Soundcloud link below, and more pictures after the jump:”

See on nativeappropriations.blogspot.com