Adoption, From a Native American Perspective


“They saw poor people, Indians. My grandmother was a sheepherder, living on an Indian reservation without electricity,” Morrill said. “My relatives couldn’t speak English, so they said— ‘we don’t know if these people are your relatives or not, so we are going to take you.’”Leland was immediately removed from his home and placed with an adoptive couple looking for Native American children to foster and adopt. The day after he was adopted, the family moved to Ontario, Canada, severing all ties Leland had to his biological, Native American family.Not uncommon for the times, before 1978, when Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act, a very high number of Indian children were removed from their homes by public and private agencies and placed in non-Indian foster and adoptive homes or institutions….“From a human trafficking point of view, I was trafficked,” said Morrill. …“They trained us within the Mormon ideology; they thought they were saving us. They thought they were doing the right thing, and from that perspective they were good people. But from a Native American perspective—they were not.”
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Indigenous Rights, Cultural Representation and Community Survival, Part III.

Via Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Andrew Jolivette, Ph.D Keynote lecture on Indigenous Rights, Cultural Representation and Community Survival, December 2, 2009
Via www.youtube.com