Tufts creates consortium for race, colonialism and diaspora – The Tufts Daily

Tufts officially launched the Consortium of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora (RCD), an interdisciplinary program linking Africana Studies, American Studies, Asian American Studies, Colonialism Studies and Latino Studies, this summer. The program’s Inaugural Celebration and Plenary, featuring a discussion with program directors, was held last night. Associate Professor of History Kris Manjapra said that RCD was …

Source: tuftsdaily.com

AMERICAN HAIR

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

American Hair is a forthcoming book, traveling exhibit and lecture series that examines our obsession with hair and the role it plays in shaping identity and culture in the United States. Hair has immense social, cultural, and political power.

See on taylormadeculture.com

Dr. Joy Lectures – Videos

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily Activist

Love my dear sister Dr. Joy DeGruy. 

She speaks the truth and makes it plain. 

See on joydegruy.com

Open Yale Courses | African American History: From Emancipation to the Present | Lecture 8 – Migration and Urbanization

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village World History

“In this lecture, Professor Holloway expands our understanding of “The Great Migration” by looking at what happens when African Americans settled in Northern and Midwestern cities. He examines the 1917 East St. Louis race riot, the 1919 Chicago race riot, and the NAACP’s Silent Protest Parade from New York City’s Fifth Avenue to Harlem. The second portion of the lecture is on African American soldiers’ experiences abroad during World War, their rising expectations for citizenship rights when they return, the new militancy that they espoused, and the racial backlash against them by whites. Black soldiers, returning to the U.S. after risking their lives in war, were lynched in uniform. Responding to this backlash, Professor Holloway shows how civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois and poet Claude McKay foreshadowed the new political climate in which African Americans would assert their rights.”

See on oyc.yale.edu

African American History: From Emancipation to the Present | Lecture 7 – Migration and Urbanization

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village World History

“In this lecture, Professor Holloway documents the “Great Migration,” beginning in the first decade of the twentieth century and continuing with increasing pace until the mid-1920s. During this time, black Americans relocated from the rural South to the urban North. This general shift in the population marked a moment of self-determination for African Americans, demonstrating that they were prepared to leave behind the lives they had made in the South for better opportunities elsewhere. It is important to see these migrations as a form of social protest against the limited political and economic opportunity in the South, racial violence, and the KKK, which was reborn and flourished in the early 1920s. As Professor Holloway reveals, urban life in the North was frequently cruel and often difficult, but it was also a life forged of free will and absent a regional and cultural history of forced bondage. The remainder of the lecture focuses on how whites’ racial anxieties were manifested in the cultural realm, using D.W. Griffith’s popular film Birth of a Nation.”

See on oyc.yale.edu

African American History: From Emancipation to the Present | Lecture 6 – Uplift, Accommodation, and Assimilation (continued)

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village World History

“In this lecture, Professor Holloway explains the two major schools of thought that emerged at the end of the century to solve the problems of black social and economic distress. The accommodationists, like Booker T. Washington, believed that the quickest way to improve the quality of black life was to forge a social peace with powerful whites, temporarily accepting the continued separation of the races and advocating vocational education as a pragmatic way for blacks to improve their lives. Opposed to Washington were people like Anna Julia Cooper and W.E.B. Du Bois who embraced assimilation and saw higher education as the cure-all to racialized problems. Du Bois, in particular, is famous for his assertion that it would be the “Talented Tenth” of the race who would lead blacks to a better life.”

See on oyc.yale.edu

The Obama Effect: Understanding Emerging Meanings of “Obama” in Anti-Discrimination Law

Via Scoop.itMixed American Life

“…the term “Obama” itself has become a new tool for racial harassment and discrimination as well as a new tool for denying the reality of racism…”

 

Indiana Law Journal
Volume 87: Issue 1 (Spring 2012)
pages 328-348
Symposium: “Labor and Employment Under the Obama Administration: A Time for Hope and Change?”

 

Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Charles and Marion Kierscht Professor of Law
University of Iowa

 

Mario L. Barnes, Professor of Law
University of California, Irvine

 

Panel 6: Employment Law: Antidiscrimination Law Under a Black President in a “Post-Racial” America?

 

– MORE –

Via www.mixedracestudies.org