And So the Search Begins: What’s the Trouble? Part 2

By Michel Beller

(Above:   My beautiful parents on their wedding day, 1958: another black-white marriage, 150 years later, when it was still illegal to “miscegenate” in 16 states)

 

I chose, as the title for this book, The Trouble with Virginia, because it fits so perfectly. Virginia is my great-great grandmother’s name.  She was born in Virginia. Of a white father and a black mother living openly as husband and wife in the South, in 1830. Plenty of trouble there–need I say more? Imagine navigating a world, a society, a culture such as what mixed-race Virginia (and others like her) must have encountered.

 

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Students For Liberty – World’s Worst Laws: Interracial marriage was illegal in Alabama until 2000

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

This is part of Students For Liberty’s “World’s Worst Laws” series. By highlighting the most egregious instances of state abuse of power, we hope to show that corruption, paternalism, and inefficiency are the rule rather than the exception when it comes to government. These stories shouldn’t boggle the mind or be excused as the workings […]

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Amazon.com: Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption (Vintage) eBook: Randall Kennedy: Kindle Store

Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption (Vintage) – Kindle edition by Randall Kennedy. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption (Vintage).

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▶ Wedding Video Anjelah Johnson and Manwell Reyes Film – YouTube

www.scinemaweddings.com When Anjelah Johnson (aka Bon Qui Qui) and Manwell Reyes (the incomparable talent from Group1Crew ) contacted us we were so excited a…

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interracial relationships

An interracial relationship (IRR) is a dating or married relationship between people from different races. This post is about the ones in America. It is an overview post – click on links to go deep…

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What Interracial and Gay Couples Know About ‘Passing’

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

As I awaited news of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions in the same-sex marriage cases last month, I began to reflect on all of the daily privileges that I receive as a result of being heterosexual — freedoms and privileges that my husband and I might not have enjoyed even fifty years ago. For our marriage is interracial.

Given my own relationship, I often contest anti-gay marriage arguments by noting the striking similarities between arguments that were once also widely made against interracial marriage. “They’re unnatural.” “It’s about tradition.” And my personal favorite, “what about the children?” In response, opponents of same-sex marriage, particularly other blacks, have often told me that the struggles of gays and lesbians are nothing at all like those African Americans (and other minorities) have faced, specifically because gays and lesbians can “pass” as straight and blacks cannot “pass” as white — as if that somehow renders the denial of marital rights in one case excusable and another inexcusable. In both cases, denying the right to marriage still works to mark those precluded from the institution as “other,” as the supposed inferior.

But what does it mean to “pass”? And what effect does passing have, in the longer term, on a relationship and on a person’s psyche?

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Three Things Asian Americans Owe to the Civil Rights Movement

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Here are three among many debts Asian Americans owe to the Civil Rights Movement:

Ending bans on interracial marriage: 36% of Asian women and 28% of Asians overall entered into interracial marriages in the U.S. in 2010, making us the most likely to marry outside our race among all groups in that year. These marriages might never have been possible if not for the Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, Loving v. Virginia, a case brought in 1967 by a white man and a black woman, ended the ban on all interracial marriages in the U.S. The Lovings were supported in their case by many civil rights groups, including the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Japanese American Citizens League.

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U.S. immigration histories of the majority of Asian Americans begin after 1965

Community Village‘s insight:

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The Incredible Love Story of Nick Vujicic and His Wife.

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Nick Vujicic, born without arms or legs, never thought he would find love. But, God blessed him with a wonderful wife. She loves him for who he is

Community Village‘s insight:

I wonder what segregationists would say to Nick and his wife?

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…and then

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It happens to be Loving Day which is what prompted me to finally get around to posting about the Cheerios.  Happy Loving Day! Interracial Marriage (black/white) has been legal for a grand total of….

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