Finding Your American Indian Tribe Using DNA

Native Heritage Project

If I had a dollar for every time I get asked a flavor of this question, I’d be on a cruise someplace warm instead of writing this in the still-blustery cold winter weather of the northlands!

So, I’m going to write the recipe of how to do this.  The process is basically the same whether you’re utilizing Y or mitochondrial DNA, but the details differ just a bit.

So, to answer the first question.  Can you find your Indian tribe utilizing DNA?  Yes, it can sometimes be done – but not for everyone, not all the time and not even for most people.  And it takes work on your part.  Furthermore, you may wind up disproving the Indian heritage in a particular line, not proving it.  If you’re still in, keep reading.

I want you to think of this as a scavenger hunt.  No one is going to give you the prize.  You…

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Black People Created White People

By Abagond

Mitochondrial Helena (c. 18,000 BC) lived in south-western France at the height of the Ice Age. As the ice started melting about 15,000 years ago, her descendants moved north into empty land. They now account for 47% of all Europeans.
In terms of mitochondrial DNA, she is the common ancestor of haplogroup H, one of the main branches of Mitochondrial Eve’s family tree. Oxford geneticist Bryan Sykes gave her the name Helena (H for Helena) in his book “The Seven Daughters of Eve” (2001).


Among her descendants
 are Marie Antoinette, Napoleon, Queen Victoria, Nicholas Copernicus, Saint Luke, Susan Sarandon and maybe half the White people in the world – along with a good number of North Africans and South West Asians as well.

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Source: abagond.wordpress.com

Haplogroup A4 Unpeeled – European, Jewish, Asian and Native American

 

“Mitochondrial DNA provides us with a unique periscope back in time to view our most distant ancestors, and the path that they took through time and place to become us, here, today.  Because mitochondrial DNA is passed from generation to generation through an all-female line, un-admixed with the DNA from the father, the mitochondrial DNA we carry today is essentially the same as that carried by our ancestors hundreds or even thousands of years ago, with the exception of an occasional mutation.”

 

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Source: dna-explained.com

Mexican Women’s Mitochondrial DNA Primarily Native American

For mtDNA variation, some studies have measured Native American, European and African contributions to Mexican and Mexican American populations, revealing 85 to 90% of mtDNA lineages are of Native American origin, with the remainder having European (5-7%) or African ancestry (3-5%).

 

See on nativeheritageproject.com

See on 500nations.us