One drop or two: Mixed-race identity and politics in America with Sharon H. Chang

When Seattle-based researcher and writer Sharon H. Chang wrote an essay that detailed why she tells her mixed-race son that he’s Asian and not white, many readers were surprised — some were downright offended — that she would deny him his “whiteness.”

Source: rabble.ca

Review of “Bird” by Crystal Chan

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Pros: Great start to book! Author has excellent ability to speak from a child’s perspective, although with more complexity and grace. Great plot and great surprises all the way to the end.

Cons: None.

Summary: “Bird” by Crystal Chan is an excellent surprise of a book! I assumed that the book would be about the trials and triumphs of a mixed race girl as she learns to handle society’s response to her identity. That isn’t a bad concept for a book, but I’ve read plenty of books like that. What I received from Crystal Chan was a book that demonstrated, rather than just showed, the fluidity of identity, childhood, culture and more on par with books like “To Kill a Mockingbird”. It began with a very gripping scene and then mellowed a little as the reader gets to travel in the life of “Bird” (the main character. From there, the plot thickens as Bird has to navigate through many worlds as a lone daughter with parents of two different cultures and perspectives, as a friend to John (who turns out to be something else than what he says), and as a griever to her long-dead brother whose impression still haunts the family.

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See on thiscollegedropout.wordpress.com

‘Brown babies’: The Mischlingskinder Story

Emmy award–winning journalist and executive producer Regina Griffin presents her  documentary, Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story, at a free screening Tuesday, January 7, at noon at the National Archives Building in…

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10 Awesome Books for Children of Mixed Race

It’s valuable for children to see themselves and their families represented in art and literature, to give them a sense of larger community, so we’ve compiled a list of 10 awesome books featuring children of mixed race and multicultural families.

See on lettersandlullabies.com

9 Things I Want to Say (But Don’t) to Your Curious Yet Racially-Charged Microaggressions Against Me & My Children

Grace Biskie knows you’re just curious, but for the sake of her sons, please keep your curiosity to yourself.

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The Tragic Mulatto Myth

Lydia Maria Child introduced the literary character that we call the tragic mulatto1 in two short stories: “The Quadroons” (1842) and “Slavery’s Pleasant Homes” (1843). She portrayed this light skinned woman as the offspring of a white slaveholder and his black female slave. This mulatto’s life was indeed tragic. She was ignorant of both her mother’s race and her own. She believed herself to be white and free. Her heart was pure, her manners impeccable, her language polished, and her face beautiful. Her father died; her “negro blood” discovered, she was remanded to slavery, deserted by her white lover, and died a victim of slavery and white male violence. A similar portrayal of the near-white mulatto appeared in Clotel(1853), a novel written by black abolitionist William Wells Brown.

See on www.ferris.edu