One Drop, but Many Views on Race

A series of portraits and an accompanying book argue that racial identity is not merely biological or genetic, but also a matter of context and even personal choice.

See on lens.blogs.nytimes.com

More Young Americans Identify as Mixed Race

Many young adults of mixed backgrounds are rejecting color lines that have defined Americans for generations.

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‘Mixed Kids Are Always So Beautiful’

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

I don’t want my daughters to believe that it is their white half that makes them attractive, or that they owe anyone an answer to the question “What are you, exactly?”

See on parenting.blogs.nytimes.com

Close Read | Toto Koopman, Model Spy

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

The world’s first famous biracial model, the subject of a new biography, graced the cover of French Vogue and served in the Italian resistance during World War II.

See on tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com

‘Far From the Tree,’ by Andrew Solomon

See on Scoop.itMixed American Life

“Parenting is no sport for perfectionists,” Andrew Solomon rather gloriously understates toward the end of “Far From the Tree,” a generous, humane and — in complex and unexpected ways — compassionate book about what it means to be a parent.

This is a passionate and affecting work that will shake up your preconceptions and leave you in a better place. It’s a book everyone should read and, although everyone won’t (at a hefty 700 pages of text, with more than 100 pages of notes, it’s no pocket guide), there’s no one who wouldn’t be a more imaginative and understanding parent — or human being — for having done so.”

“There is no such thing as reproduction,” Solomon points out on the first page, only acts of “production.”

See on www.nytimes.com

Alexander Saxton, Historian of Black History, Asian American Studies, Critical Whiteness Studies Dies at 93 | work reviewed

See on Scoop.itCommunity Village Daily

The New York Times  2012-09-01

“…His contributions as a cultural historian are considered his most enduring.

Mr. Saxton’s first historical book, “The Indispensable Enemy: Labor and the Anti-Chinese Movement in California,” became a landmark of labor history, describing how 19th- and 20th-century labor unions used racism against Chinese immigrants as a tool for unifying and organizing white union members.

“It challenged one of the foundational stories of the labor movement,” said Eric Foner, a Columbia University professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. “Instead of the story of solidarity and democracy usually told, Saxton showed how racism was one of labor’s most important organizing tools.”

The critical success of the book helped Mr. Saxton establish one of the first Asian-American studies program in the United States at U.C.L.A. in the early 1970s.

His 1975 paper “Blackface Minstrelsy and Jacksonian Ideology,” [March 1975] tracing the links between blackface minstrelsy and the ideology of white supremacy, is considered one of the early texts in black history studies; and a 1990 book, “The Rise and Fall of the White Republic,” is known as one of the foundations of “critical whiteness studies,” an academic field that examines the assumptions underlying “whiteness” as a racial designation and political organizing principle….”

See on www.mixedracestudies.org