And So the Search Begins: What’s the Trouble? Part 2

By Michel Beller

(Above:   My beautiful parents on their wedding day, 1958: another black-white marriage, 150 years later, when it was still illegal to “miscegenate” in 16 states)

 

I chose, as the title for this book, The Trouble with Virginia, because it fits so perfectly. Virginia is my great-great grandmother’s name.  She was born in Virginia. Of a white father and a black mother living openly as husband and wife in the South, in 1830. Plenty of trouble there–need I say more? Imagine navigating a world, a society, a culture such as what mixed-race Virginia (and others like her) must have encountered.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: randomaunt.wordpress.com

PHOTOS: An Intimate Look At Virginia’s First Legal Interracial Marriage

Before June of 1967, sixteen states still prohibited interracial marriage, including Virginia, the home of Richard Perry Loving, a white man, and his wife, Mildred Loving, a woman of African-American and Native-American descent.

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The Lovings at their Central Point home in southeastern Caroline with their children

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The Lovings at their Central Point home in southeastern Caroline with their children, Peggy, Donald and Sidney, in 1967. The last U.S. couple to fight the legal battle to marry outside their phenotype / haplotype 
photo from
http://blogs.fredericksburg.com/newsdesk/2012/02/06/film-retells-lovings%E2%80%99-love-story/
also at
http://www.philasun.com/news/2697/28/Loving-Story-shows-unlikely-civil-rights-heroes.html

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