My Transracial Adoption Journey – Part 1 | Mixed Space

I must admit that when my wife first suggested we adopt I wasn’t sure if I was up for it.  We already had our daughter but we wanted another and circumstances were such that this was probably the only way.  The question I kept asking myself was “Could I love a child that wasn’t my own?”

Source: www.mixedspace.org

My Transracial Adoption Journey – Part 2 | Mixed Space

We didn’t set out to transracially adopt.  In fact, quite the opposite.  When you apply for adoption they give you a form with boxes to check to indicate what you’re looking for.  They give options such as age, gender, and even what disabilities or medical history you are willing to accept (such as depression or deafness).  Of course, they also include race.  This is no guarantee that this is the kid they will offer.  Their goal is to find a child as close to what you want as they can.  They’re not interested in just dumping children on people.  But you also have to understand that the more restrictive your options the longer a placement will take.

Source: www.mixedspace.org

Transracial Adoption – Finding One’s Truth

I was reading through a public site on transracial adoption about a middle school aged adopted child and it made me realize yet again how many layers of complexity transracial adoption brings to our lives, and especially to the lives of adopted children.There is a saying that when…

Source: www.transracialparenting.com

Standing up for our children

If a child grows up with a parent who has zero tolerance of racism, the child grows up knowing that it is not okay to undervalue other human beings. Is this radical? Perhaps.

See on www.transracialparenting.com

2014 Writer’s Submission: Mixed Remixed Writers’ Submission Form 2014

We are seeking writers to read at the 2014 Mixed Remixed whose work addresses the Mixed experience. This includes, but is not limited to: stories of interracial or intercultural relationships, transracial or transcultural adoption and the exploration of multiracial and multicultural identity.

See on www.mixedremixed.org

Rule No. 1: Notice Difference

My son has taken to calling himself Black as he has learned that Black is a culture/ethnic heritage and not necessarily a skin color. At school someone overheard him say, “Cause I’m Black!

See on www.transracialparenting.com