My Transracial Adoption Journey – Part 1 | Mixed Space

I must admit that when my wife first suggested we adopt I wasn’t sure if I was up for it.  We already had our daughter but we wanted another and circumstances were such that this was probably the only way.  The question I kept asking myself was “Could I love a child that wasn’t my own?”

Source: www.mixedspace.org

One Drop Vlog Episode 4 part 1: Georgia State University & Greatest Minds Society – YouTube

Clips from One Drop of Love visit to Georgia State University for the Greatest Minds Society panel and discussion on racial identity. September 18, 2014. LIN…

Source: www.youtube.com

My Transracial Adoption Journey – Part 2 | Mixed Space

We didn’t set out to transracially adopt.  In fact, quite the opposite.  When you apply for adoption they give you a form with boxes to check to indicate what you’re looking for.  They give options such as age, gender, and even what disabilities or medical history you are willing to accept (such as depression or deafness).  Of course, they also include race.  This is no guarantee that this is the kid they will offer.  Their goal is to find a child as close to what you want as they can.  They’re not interested in just dumping children on people.  But you also have to understand that the more restrictive your options the longer a placement will take.

Source: www.mixedspace.org

My Transracial Adoption Journey – Part 3 | Mixed Space

Suddenly we were parents of a baby again!  And anyone who has had a baby knows that “sleeping like a baby” is anything but!  Unless of course they meant “wakes up every two hours wanting to be fed.”  Still, he was our little guy from three weeks old.  Honestly, it felt more like we were over-glorified babysitters for the state at first.  But in time he found a place in our hearts and that place grew and grew until we couldn’t imagine him not being in our lives.

Source: www.mixedspace.org

R.I.P. Author and Los Angeles Black Panther Leader Wayne Pharr

 

Wayne Pharr, former Black Panther who fought the Los Angeles Police in a historic gun battle in 1969, passed away on September 6, 2014 at age 64.  After Pharr and his fellow Panthers defended themselves from the long violent attack by the newly formed LAPD SWAT unit, he became a political prisoner who was exonerated of attempted murder and all other serious offenses.  Pharr eventually became a successful realtor in Southern California, a subject of the documentary, “41st and Central”, and most recently authored the well received autobiography, Nine Lives of A Black Panther: A Story of Survival.

 

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Source: goodblacknews.org

Migrant Child Labor in the United States [VIDEO]

 

Posted on July 21, 2010 by WITNESS


This post was written by Chanchala Gunewardena
, (Clark University 2011), Summer 2010 intern in WITNESS’ Communications department.

Last Thursday, WITNESS was invited to The Paley Center for Media for a screening of a special segment of NBC’s Dateline, titled America Now: Children of the Harvest. This piece, a follow up to a 1998 Emmy Award winning report on migrant farm workers and their families, attempts to see, what has developed and changed in the lives of a particular group of people twelve years on. More specifically however, it is focused on the issue of child labor, as migrant families who work in the agricultural sector tend to be assisted in their work by their whole family, including children under the legal working age (for this specific sector) of twelve.

 

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Source: blog.witness.org

Notes towards a Chicano history of the US

 

Schools in the US teach a White or Anglo American history of the country. Because of White guilt it is full of lies, half-truths and stuff left out. There is much to learn and unlearn:

 

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Source: abagond.wordpress.com