Infographic: The Multi-Racial and Ethnic Shift in America

The country is slowly becoming more like a “rainbow,” according to a new book by Paul Taylor and Pew Research called “The Next America”.

Defining Mixed

These groups are all mixed in their heritage.

  1. Hispanic people are mixed by definition. Hispanic is not a race and Latin American countries have not had anti-miscegenation laws like the U.S. Most Latinos are part Amerindian mixed with some part(s) Spanish / Portuguese / Black.
  2. Black people have been mixed with others since the founding of the U.S., sometimes by choice and sometimes by force (enslavement rape). Compare the common skin tone of African-Americans to the common skin tone of Africans from Africa.
  3. Asian people have been mixing with others since anti-miscegenation laws have been abolished in the U.S.
  4. Other people includes Native American (1%) and Mixed people.
  5. White people are often mixed with ‘5 shades of White’, or they are White Latino, or they are ‘One drop of color / ‘passing as White’, aka 1/16th of color. White is not counted as White when mixed with people of color, which accounts for the decline in White numbers over time. The other reason the numbers for White drop is because Europeans no longer immigrate to the U.S. at any where near the same rate of other groups. European countries tend to provide good health care coverage and tend to have lower gun violence. For example, in the U.K. the routine patrol officers do not carry guns.

The numbers

Intermarriage among people of different races is increasingly common. In 1980, just 7% of all marriages in the U.S. were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity.  In 2010, that share has doubled to 15% of all new marriages in the U.S. Hispanics (26%) and Asians (28%) were most likely to “marry out,” compared with 9% of whites and 17% of blacks. – Pew Research

Marrying Out

If two people of mixed heritage marry, does Pew Research count that as an intermarriage?

Genocide or Population Control

  • Amerindians used to make up 100% of the Americas. Now the U.S. is only 1% Native American.
  • Black population is only expected to grow by 1% in 50 years. Mass-incarceration is removing Black people during the prime of their life, the time when most people are starting families. And police and vigilantes are killing Black people at the rate of 1 every 28 hours, and sometimes more frequently.
  • Asians were murdered by White people during the gold rush and also excluded from entering the U.S. between 1882 and 1965.
  • Latinos were lynched by White people during the gold rush.

When the oppressed turn into oppressors: Parenting & internalised racism

Article by Guilaine Kinouani


Excerpts selected by Glenn Robinson

The privilege of being lighter skinned

I am a lighter skinned Black woman. I am light enough to benefit from shadism but dark enough to still be accepted as Black. A uniquely privileged position. Throughout my upbringing I have received messages in my environment that this made me more desirable, more worthy, and/or more significant than my darker skinned counterparts. These messages were both covert and overt and articulated in the home and outside the home, at school, in the media etc… Pretty much everywhere.  There is no doubt that I was, at times, spoken to in kinder voices or treated with more patience than my darker skinned peers or sisters by both people of colour and by White people, all things being equal.  In time, I have learnt that my femininity and womanhood would be more easily accepted.

Parenting and internalised racism


…in our efforts to compensate for racism, we socialise children into injustice, compliance and complicity and instil a sense of inferiority in them. In doing so we may limit children’s scope to be themselves. We may reduce our capacity to respond to them with compassion and kindness. We may attend to stereotypes of what our children could be or could be seen as, rather than attending to them as unique persons. In a nutshell, we may contribute to racism’s self-fulfilling prophecies, perpetuate racial inequalities and more worryingly, may increase their risk of psychological  distress.


The perpetuation of oppression is everyone’s business

  • Internalising racism is adaptive. It is no pathology.
     
  • The construction of reality is controlled by the dominant group and circulated throughout society
     
  • those who are oppressed come to internalise the dominant group’s interests as their own
     
  • the interests of the oppressors are presented as actually reflecting everyone’s best interests…
     
  • the construction of a superior class is dependent upon the existence of an inferior one.
     
     
  • double bind: Be like us to be human. Trying to be like us is evidence that you are not human. 

Click through for the whole article. 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: racereflections.co.uk

Many pearls of wisdom in this article!

Note: Parents of all colors can have internalized racism and bias.

White People | Official Full Documentary | MTV

What does it mean to be white? MTV’s ‘White People’ is a groundbreaking documentary on race that aims to answer that question from the viewpoint of young white people living in America today. The film follows Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and filmmaker, Jose Antonio Vargas, as he travels across the country to get this complicated conversation started. ‘White People’ asks what’s fair when it comes to affirmative action, if colorblindness is a good thing, what privilege really means, and what it’s like to become the “white minority” in your neighborhood. For more information on ‘White People,’ and to join the conversation, head to race.lookdifferent.org

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

To understand Mixed American Live it helps to understand what it means to be White.

#Whiteness

#WhiteStudies

Ep. 23 – Susan Graham of Project RACE

On Episode 23 of The Multiracial Family Man Podcast, host Alex Barnett (the White, Jewish husband of a Black woman who converted to Judaism and the father of a 3 year-old, Biracial son) is joined by guest, Susan Graham, the founder of Project RACE (http://www.projectrace.com/). 

Listen as Susan talks about her youth in Detroit, her interracial marriage, and raising biracial, Jewish children.  Susan then discusses how her experience of being forced to “check a box” on census forms led her to create Project RACE, which advocates for multiracial families and is leading the charge for identifying marrow donors for those who are multiracial.

For more on host, Alex Barnett, please check out his website: www.alexbarnettcomic.com or visit him on Facebook (www.facebook.com/alexbarnettcomic) or on Twitter at @barnettcomic

Sourced through Scoop.it from: directory.libsyn.com

Sometimes Saying “My Birthmom Didn’t Want Me” Is an Adoptee’s Coping Mechanism

“When you’re adopted, at some level, your story is defined by a person who did not want you. Not wanting you may have been defined by wanting the best for you — in fact, most of the time it is.” – …

Sourced through Scoop.it from: theadoptedlife.com

Mixed Nation: We Are One Tour & Documentary

We will travel across country in search of beautifully blended stories while spreading our positive, multicultural movement!

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.kickstarter.com

I met the founder at Mixed Remixed this year. He’s a stand up guy. Please support him and his project.

Misty Copeland

Misty Copeland (1982- ), an American classical ballet dancer, in 2015 became the first Black American woman ever to become a principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre (ABT). That makes her one of the top ballerinas at one of the top classical ballet companies in the world! Mikhail Baryshnikov was a principal at ABT.

 

In the US, ballet is mainly seen as a White thing. Accordingly, many assume that rail-thin White women make the best ballerinas. But, as Copeland herself has shown, that comes from prejudice, not from the demands of the art.

 

Copeland did not start ballet till age 13. Many professionals start at age three. Yet she could do in months what took most girls years of practice.

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com

How One Law Banning Ethnic Studies Led to Its Rise

To fight an Arizona law censoring culturally relevant classes, educators have started a nationwide movement.

 

“Mexican American studies has spread to high schools at a rate no one could have imagined before Arizona banned the class in 2010.”

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theatlantic.com

Thank you Steven Riley @mixed_race

Critical Children’s Lit: Challenging Racism with Graphic Novels

This book traces the history and diversity of Latin@ people in the US and shows readers the roots of racism and how it continues today.  Like Still I Rise, Latino USA presents multiple perspectives within and among Latin@ communities about historical and contemporary issues, demonstrating how Latin@s aren’t a homogeneous group and encouraging critical thinking.

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.criticalchildrenslit.com

HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

cultural appropriation

Cultural appropriation is when you take something from another culture over the objections of that culture. It is cultural theft. It is especially common when racists borrow “cool stuff” from cultures whose people they look down on.


It is that thing where if Black people do something
, like twerking or wearing cornrows, it is looked down on as “ghetto” or “hood” or “unprofessional”, but when White people do the very same thing, it is suddenly admired as “cool” or “edgy” or “epic”.

 

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com

Thank you Abagond! You have given me the vocabulary I have been looking for! Many people don’t understand the difference between appropriating in a mocking way vs. partaking and assimilating in a respectful way.