The Multi-Racial and Ethnic Shift in America

Graphic based on Pew Research article “The Next America”

The country is slowly becoming more like a “rainbow,” according to a new book by Paul Taylor and Pew Research called “The Next America”.

Defining Mixed

These groups are mixed in their heritage.

  1. Hispanic people are mixed by definition. Hispanic is not a race and Latin American countries have not had anti-miscegenation laws like the U.S. Most Latinos are part Amerindian mixed with some part(s) Spanish / Portuguese / Black.
  2. Black people have been mixing with others since before the founding of the U.S., sometimes by choice and sometimes by force (enslavement rape).
  3. Asian people have been mixing with others in the U.S. since anti-miscegenation laws have been abolished, and also before anti-miscegenation laws were in place.
  4. Other people includes Native American (1%) and Mixed people.
  5. Native American people are often of mixed heritage. The U.S. government made it their policy to assimilate Native American’s into U.S. cities.
  6. White people are often mixed with ‘5 shades of White’, or they are White Latino, or they are ‘One drop’ of color / ‘passing as White’, aka 1/16th or 1/32th of color. White is not counted as White when mixed with people of color, which accounts for the decline in White numbers over time. The other reason the numbers for White drop is because Europeans no longer immigrate to the U.S. at any where near the same rate of other groups. European countries tend to provide good universal health care and tend to have lower gun violence. Police do not routinely carry guns on their person in Britain, Ireland, Iceland, Norway, New Zealand and India.  In Norway officers carry arms in their cars but not on their person.

Marrying Out 

Intermarriage among people of different races is increasingly common. In 1980, just 7% of all marriages in the U.S. were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity.  In 2010, that share has doubled to 15% of all new marriages in the U.S. Hispanics (26%) and Asians (28%) were most likely to “marry out,” compared with 9% of whites and 17% of blacks. – Pew Research

If two people of mixed heritage marry, does Pew Research count that as marrying out / intermarriage?

(im)migration Policy

There is no Mixed American Life without pluralism. There is no pluralism without (im)migration.

The 1964 Civil Rights act, pushed by Dr. Martin Luther King’s efforts, pushed change to U.S. immigration policy so that quotas are no longer based on race. This explains why the graph above shows population diversity quickly expand after 1964.

Title II of the 1964 Civil Rights act outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion or national origin.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965  abolished the National Origins Formula that had been in place in the United States since 1921.

The Nation Origins Formula restricted immigration on the basis of existing proportions of U.S. population, severely restricting immigration of people who were not already represented in the current U.S. ethnic groups of the time.

Current immigration law now favors the highly educated. Now U.S. immigration laws are based on class instead of race.

The Immigration Act of 1924 included an Asian Exclusion Act and Nation Origins Act which outright banned the immigration of Arabs and Asians.

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 was repealed in 1943. Now U.S. culture finally considers Chinese food to be American food, now in 2015.

List of United States immigration legislation starting from 1790.

List of current U.S. Visas

  • There are 35 categories of migrant visas
  • There are 17 categories of immigrant visas
    • Immediate Relative & Family Sponsored (6)
    • Employer Sponsored – Employment (11)

Genocide and Population Control

  • Amerindians used to make up 100% of the Americas. Now the U.S. is only 1% Native American.
  • Black population is expected to grow by only 1% in 50 years. Mass-incarceration and the war on drugs (war on people) is removing Black people during the prime of their life, the time when most people are starting families. And U.S. police are killing Black people at the rate of 1 every 26 hours in 2015, and U.S. police and vigilantes killed a Black person at the rate of 1 every 28 hours in 2012. Not to mention historic lynchings.
  • Asians were murdered by White people during the gold rush and also excluded from entering the U.S. between 1882 and 1965.
  • Latinos were lynched by White people during the gold rush, and in the South West between 1846 to 1925. Latino communities are also targeted by the war on drugs (war on people), and in-turn also targeted by mass-incarceration.
  • Murdered by police Amerindian, Black, and Latino people are murdered by police more than other groups

David Bowie: China Girl

Abagond

Remarks:

My favourite David Bowie song. In 1983 it went to #10 on the US pop chart and #2 in Britain. It is his remake of the 1977 Iggy Pop song of the same name that they wrote together in a castle in France. Nile Rodgers produces, Stevie Ray Vaughn plays lead guitar.

The video was shot in Chinatown in Sydney, Australia. It was banned in several countries because of the love scene at the end.

This is the video, by the way, that beat out Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” for Best Male Video at the first MTV Video Music Awards in 1984. And that was after David Bowie had openly criticized MTV for being racist. Which brings up:

Is “China Girl” racist?

In 1983, Bowie said of the “China Girl” and “Let’s Dance” videos:

“They’re almost like Russian social realism, very naive. And the message that they have is very…

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Multiracial Family Man: On being Afro-Latina, transracial adoption by White farmers, coping with tragic accidents and physical disability, and writing a memoir, with author Lorie Tensen, Ep. 64

Ep. 64: Lorie Tensen is an author. She’s also “bionic.” It’s not hard to see why. Having been dealt a number of challenges in life, she’s rebuilt herself stronger than ever before. She was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 7, 1966. The result of an affair between a married, Black detective and a foreigner: a woman from Honduras. Seven months later, she was adopted into a White, Dutch family and raised in a small, farming community two hours west of the Twin Cities. At the age of 12, Lorie suffered a terrible accident, resulting in the loss of her right hand and lower arm. This led to years of grappling with her own self-image and self-esteem. Later in life, she struggled through college, where her racial background set her apart. Then, she was a single mom working hard to make ends meet. She later married, but the marriage ended in divorce, and Lorie found herself struggling again. But, by focusing on her passion, on raising her kids, and on her goal of giving back, she found herself on the right career path. Hers in an inspirational story, and you can read about it in her memoir: “Taking My Hand Out of My Pocket” available here: http://www.amazon.com/Taking-Hand-Out-My-Pocket/dp/0692266054 For more on host, Alex Barnett, please check out his website: www.alexbarnettcomic.com or visit him on Facebook (www.facebook.com/alexbarnettcomic) or on Twitter at @barnettcomic To subscribe to the Multiracial Family Man, please click here: MULTIRACIAL FAMILY MAN PODCAST Intro and Outro Music is Funkorama by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons – By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Sourced through Scoop.it from: multiracialfamilyman.libsyn.com

I screamed out loud twice during this podcast. 

 

The meat grinder was horrific, but the comment stating that an Afro-Latino would not want to go to a college that had Black people, that comment cuts deep

 

*crying*