Infographic: The Multi-Racial and Ethnic Shift in America

Graphic based on Pew Research article “The Next America”

The country is slowly becoming more like a “rainbow,” according to a new book by Paul Taylor and Pew Research called “The Next America”.

Defining Mixed

These groups are all mixed in their heritage.

  1. Hispanic people are mixed by definition. Hispanic is not a race and Latin American countries have not had anti-miscegenation laws like the U.S. Most Latinos are part Amerindian mixed with some part(s) Spanish / Portuguese / Black.
  2. Black people have been mixed with others since the founding of the U.S., sometimes by choice and sometimes by force (enslavement rape).
  3. Asian people have been mixing with others since anti-miscegenation laws have been abolished in the U.S.
  4. Other people includes Native American (1%) and Mixed people.
  5. White people are often mixed with ‘5 shades of White’, or they are White Latino, or they are ‘One drop of color / ‘passing as White’, aka 1/16th of color. White is not counted as White when mixed with people of color, which accounts for the decline in White numbers over time. The other reason the numbers for White drop is because Europeans no longer immigrate to the U.S. at any where near the same rate of other groups. European countries tend to provide good health care coverage and tend to have lower gun violence. For example, in the U.K. the routine patrol officers do not carry guns.

The numbers

Intermarriage among people of different races is increasingly common. In 1980, just 7% of all marriages in the U.S. were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity.  In 2010, that share has doubled to 15% of all new marriages in the U.S. Hispanics (26%) and Asians (28%) were most likely to “marry out,” compared with 9% of whites and 17% of blacks. – Pew Research

Marrying Out

If two people of mixed heritage marry, does Pew Research count that as an intermarriage?

Genocide or Population Control

  • Amerindians used to make up 100% of the Americas. Now the U.S. is only 1% Native American.
  • Black population is only expected to grow by 1% in 50 years. Mass-incarceration is removing Black people during the prime of their life, the time when most people are starting families. And police and vigilantes are killing Black people at the rate of 1 every 28 hours, and sometimes more frequently.
  • Asians were murdered by White people during the gold rush and also excluded from entering the U.S. between 1882 and 1965.
  • Latinos were lynched by White people during the gold rush.
  • Murdered by police Amerindian, Black, and Latino people are murdered by police more than other groups

Three “Mixed” people killed by police in Las Vegas since 1996

Monday, April 4, 2011 at 4:45 am

2895 E. Charleston Blvd.

Las Vegas SWAT officer Mike Quick fatally shot Michael Dean Chevalier, 48, after Chevalier enters an apartment on 2695 E. Charleston Blvd., takes a woman hostage, and sexually assaults her.


Wednesday, September 2, 2009 at 12:30 pm

1230 Comstock Drive

After setting his home on fire, apparently to draw officers to the scene, Bryan Benjamin Hanasz, 36, shot at arriving firefighters and police, one of whom was wounded. Three Las Vegas police officers shot and killed Hanasz at the home near Vegas Drive and Martin Luther King Boulevard.


Friday, January 19, 1996 at 5:42 pm

Interstate 15 at Apex

On Interstate 15 near Apex, Nevada Highway Patrol trooper Anthony Skordoulis approached a homeless man, Miguel Angel Gomez, 44, to offer assistance after spotting the man holding a “need gas” sign. Gomez shot him in the leg, leading to a standoff in which he and two Las Vegas officers fired their weapons. Gomez was wounded but lived five more years.


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Husband turns wife’s tears into million dollar idea – One World Dolls



I don’t see their Black doll who wears a natural.


I don’t like that the White doll is labeled Caucasian, a racial label. The Black doll is not labeled by race. Their black doll is labeled African.

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Book: Malinche, Pocahontas, and Sacagawea

The first Europeans to arrive in North America’s various regions relied on Native women to help them navigate unfamiliar customs and places. This study of three well-known and legendary female cultural intermediaries, Malinche, Pocahontas, and Sacagawea, examines their initial contact with Euro-Americans, their negotiation of multinational frontiers, and their symbolic representation over time.

Well before their first contact with Europeans or Anglo-Americans, the three women’s societies of origin—the Aztecs of Central Mexico (Malinche), the Powhatans of the mid-Atlantic coast (Pocahontas), and the Shoshones of the northern Rocky Mountains (Sacagawea)—were already dealing with complex ethnic tensions and social change. Using wit and diplomacy learned in their Native cultures and often assigned to women, all three individuals hoped to benefit their own communities by engaging with the new arrivals. But as historian Rebecca Kay Jager points out, Europeans and white Americans misunderstood female expertise in diplomacy and interpreted indigenous women’s cooperation as proof of their attraction to Euro-American men and culture. This confusion has created a historical misrepresentation of Malinche, Pocahontas, and Sacagawea as gracious Indian princesses, giving far too little credit to their skills as intermediaries.

Examining their initial contact with Europeans and their work on multinational frontiers, Jager removes these three famous icons from the realm of mythology and cultural fantasy and situates each woman’s behavior in her own cultural context. Drawing on history, anthropology, ethnohistory, and oral tradition, Jager demonstrates their shrewd use of diplomacy and fulfillment of social roles and responsibilities in pursuit of their communities’ future advantage.

Jager then goes on to delineate the symbolic roles that Malinche, Pocahontas, and Sacagawea came to play in national creation stories. Mexico and the United States have molded their legends to justify European colonization and condemn it, to explain Indian defeat and celebrate indigenous prehistory. After hundreds of years, Malinche, Pocahontas and Sacagawea are still relevant. They are the symbolic mothers of the Americas, but more than that, they fulfilled crucial roles in times of pivotal and enduring historical change. Understanding their stories brings us closer to understanding our own histories.

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HT Steven Riley @mixed_race

Stokely Carmichael and Black Power — Abernathy

Cocky. Self-assured. Reckless. Radical. Activist. Organizer. Leader. These words, and more, describe one of the unsung heroes of the Black Power Movement.

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Syrian Refugees and America’s Long History of Selective Immigration Policy

On November 13, 2015, Yazidi refugees In Derek, Syria, react to news that their homeland of Sinjar was liberated from ISIS extremists.
Photo: John Moore/Getty Images


If the Senate votes yes to the American SAFE Act that Congress passed last week, it will be much more difficult for Syrian civil war refugees to come into the United States. It’s just the latest in American immigration policy shaped by xenophobia and racism.

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The hypocrisy of #AllLivesMatter

Larry Wilmore Reveals His Strategy for Covering Race on ‘The Nightly Show’

On diversity:
People ask me, “How is your team so diverse?” Because that’s what I wanted. My mission from the beginning was to find people from different backgrounds and hire an eclectic team.

On his duty to cover race issues:

I’ll be honest with you, I remember thinking, I may as well be the one covering this sort of thing and be honest about it, be direct about it and let the chips fall where they may.

On making the show universal:

We look at our show as illuminating issues that should be important to everybody. We come from the viewpoint of the underdog.

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‘Rising Voices’ Chronicles Effort to Save Lakota Language

Florentine Films/Hott Productions, in association with The Language Conservancy, presents a new documentary project: Rising Voices/Hótȟaŋiŋpi. Five years in the making, this multi-platform project tells the story of Lakota Language Revitalization.

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HT Colorlines

“Generation Mix:” Is All This Talk of “Multiracialism” An Advance?

Artist, activist and creator of the multimedia comic book Hafrocentric Juliana “Jules” Smith and Dr. Rainier Spencer, author of Reproducing Race: The Paradox of Generation Mix discuss their various critiques of popular approaches to “multiracial” identity.

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